The Life and Correspondence of Rufus King: Comprising His Letters, Private and Official, His Public Documents, and His Speeches, Volume 5

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Rufus King
G. P. Putnam's sons, 1898 - Legislators
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Page 26 - It was not possible for me to remain ignorant of, or indifferent to recent transactions. The conduct of the Directory of France towards our country; their insidious...
Page 26 - ... and those of their agents to countenance and invigorate opposition ; their disregard of solemn treaties and the laws of nations ; their war upon our defenceless commerce ; their treatment of our ministers of peace...
Page 117 - ... to neutral ports and places, but also from one place belonging to an enemy, to another place belonging to an enemy, whether they be under the jurisdiction of the same power, or under the several; unless such ports or places shall be actually blockaded, besieged or invested.
Page 117 - It shall be lawful for the citizens of either country to sail with their ships and merchandise (contraband goods always excepted) from any port whatever, to any port of the enemy of the other, and to sail and trade with their ships and merchandise, with perfect security and liberty, from the countries, ports and places of those who are enemies of...
Page 138 - I think it would be well to consider this on your part as confidential, leaving to the government to retain or make it public, as the general good may require. Had the Emperor gone further, and said that he condemned our vessels going voluntarily into his ports in breach of his municipal laws, we might have admitted it rigorously legal, though not friendly. But his condemnation of vessels taken on the high seas, by his privateers, Correspondence 171 and carried involuntarily into his ports, is justifiable...
Page 118 - Contracting parties, although the whole lading or any part thereof should appertain to the enemies of either, Contraband goods being always excepted. It is also agreed in like manner that the same liberty be extended to persons who are on board a free ship, with this effect that...
Page 117 - And whereas it frequently happens that vessels sail for a port or place belonging to an enemy without knowing that the same is...
Page 26 - Sir, no one can more cordially approve of the wise and prudent measures of your administration. They ought to inspire universal confidence, and will no doubt, combined with the state of things, call from Congress such laws and means, as will enable you to meet the full force and extent of the crisis. " Satisfied, therefore, that you have sincerely wished and...
Page 114 - That his majesty has a right to make such municipal regulations as he may deem proper with regard to foreign commerce, neither is, nor has been denied : for example, he may forbid the entry into the ports of France of American ships which have touched in England, or been destined to England, and he may either sequester or confiscate such vessels of the United States as shall infract these laws, after due promulgation and notice thereof; but beyond this the United States hope and believe that his...
Page 19 - Your interference was then, sir,, made the pretext of detaining us for four years in custody, by which very extensive and useful plans of settlement within these states were broken up. The misfortunes which you brought upon the objects of your persecution were incalculable. Almost all of us wasted four of the best years of our lives in prison. As to me, I should have brought along with me my father and his family, including a brother, whose name perhaps even you will not read without emotions of...

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