An Encyclopaedia of Gardening, Comprising the Theory and Practice of Horticulture, Floriculture, Arboriculture and Landscape-gardening, Including... a General History of Gardening in All Countries

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1822 - Gardening - 1469 pages
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Contents

Gardening as affected by different Forms of Government and States of Society
112
PART II
120
Portography or the Nomenclature and Description of Plants
134
Of forming and preserving Herbariums
140
used in Tarts Confectionary and Domestic Medicine
142
Natural Method of Jussieu
157
Vegetable Organology or the external Structure of Plants
164
Vegetable Anatomy or the internal Structure of Plants
170
Vegetable Chemistry or primary Principles of Plants
176
Simple Products
193
Process of Nutrition
202
Process of Vegetable Developement 212
212
Anomalies of Vegetable Developement
219
Changes consequent upon Impregnation
225
Sect XI
230
Vegetable Pathology or the Diseases and Casualties of Vegetable Life
235
Natural Decay
241
Civil Causes affecting the Distribution of Plants
247
Origin of Culture as derived from the Study of Vegetables
261
Of the Analysis and constituent Parts of Soils
267
Of the Improvement of Soils
273
Rotation of Crops
280
Seer HI Of the specific Application of fermentative and Fossil or Saline
299
Heat Eight and Electricity
310
Tools
318
Sacs HE Utensils
327
Miscellaneous Articles used in Gardening
339
Sacs IE Fixed Structures
352
Edttcet used in Gardening
376
Decorative Buildings
393
Of 4 Improvement of the Mechanical Agents of Gardening
405
Operations of Gardening In which Strength is chiefly required in the Operator
407
Chap II
413
Transferring Figures and Designs to irregular Surfaces
420
Scientific Processes and Operations
429
Operations of Rearing and Culture
445
Operations for retarding or accelerating Vegetation
463
Operations of Exotic Culture in Hothouses lis
471
Chap IV
479
Sect IIL Of the Beauty and Order of Garden Scenery
486
Our II
513
Fruit Shrubs
519
Chap IV
525
Pruning and Training
531
Vermin Insects Diseases and Accidents
537
Of Gathering and Storing Orchard Fruits
543
Pinery
549
Details in the Construction of Culinary HotHouses
555
f Of tire Culture of tlie Vinery
614
Of the Culture of the CherryHouse
625
Of the Culture of the Cucumber
643
Forcing the Strawberry in HotHouses Pits and HotBeds
653
Forcing Peas
661
I
776
Sett I
783
Scesect 2
807
Nuts
833
Chap X
840
BOOK II
894
Chap II
904
Of Planting the Shrubbery
912
Chap VI
930
Chap VIII
938
Subsect 10
959
Border Flowers
992
Subsect 14
1004
Sect111 Flowers for particular Purposes
1007
Catalogue of Hardy Trees with showy Flowers J013
1014
Select Shrubs
1020
tions of Shrubs for particular Purposes
1028
Select GreenHouse Plants
1034
Woody GreenHouse Plants
1039
Climbing Green House Plants
1048
Climbing BarkStove Plants
1063
Selections of Dry and BarkStove Plants for such as have only
1069
Of the Uses of Trees individually as Objects of Consumption
1075
Of the Classification of Plantations or Assemblages of Trees
1081
On forming Plantations in which Ornament or Effect is the leading Consider
1093
Of the Culture and Management of Plantations 1102
1102
Of appropriating the Products of Trees preparing them for Use or Sale
1114
Chap VII
1123
Arborifuharal Catalogue
1134
Softwooded Trees
1145
Of the Beauties of LandscapeGardening as an inventive and mixed
1151
Of the Materials of LandscapeGardening
1158
Of operating with Water 1166
1166
or the accidental Accompaniments to the Materials of Landscape
1174
On laying out Private Gardens or Residences
1180
Public Gardens
1186
Of the Practice of Landscape Gardening
1195
Private British Gardens
1203
Commercial Gardens
1212
Sect IIL Public Gardens
1219
Topographical Survey of the British Isles in respect to Gardening
1221
Wales
1247
Ireland
1257
British Works on Gardening
1263
Of the Literature of Gardening in other Countries
1292
Subsect 15
1316
BOOK II
1320
Of the intellectual Education which a Gardener may give himself
1328
Of Economical Education or the general Conduct and Economy
1336
American Cress
1347
GENERAL INDEX
1353
Purslane
1357
748
1438

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 5 - God Almighty first planted a garden; and, indeed, it is the purest of human pleasures. It is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man; without which buildings and palaces are but gross...
Page 69 - At that moment appeared Kent, painter enough to taste the charms of landscape, bold and opinionative enough to dare and to dictate, and born with a genius to strike out a great system from the twilight of imperfect essays.
Page 304 - ... thought them liable to be injured. But, when I had learned, that bodies on the surface of the earth become, during a still and serene night, colder than the atmosphere, by radiating their heat to the heavens, I perceived immediately a just reason for the practice, which I had before deemed useleu. Being desirous, however, of acquiring some precise information on this subject...
Page 292 - ... situation in which it is kept, is of importance. It should, if possible, be defended from the sun. To preserve it under sheds would be of great use ; or to make the site of a dunghill on the north side of a wall. The floor on which the dung is heaped should, if possible, be paved with flat stones ; and there should be a little inclination from each side towards the centre, in which there should be drains connected with a small well, furnished with a pump, by which any fluid matter may be collected...
Page 294 - When lime, whether freshly burnt or slacked, is mixed with any moist fibrous vegetable matter, there is a strong action between the lime and the vegetable matter, and they form a kind of compost together, of which a part is usually soluble in water. By this kind of operation, lime renders matter which was before comparatively inert nutritive...
Page 307 - Snow and ice are bad conductors of heat ; and when the ground is covered with snow, or the surface of the soil or of water is frozen, the roots or bulbs of the plants beneath are protected by the congealed water from the influence of the atmosphere, the temperature of which in northern winters is usually very much below the freezing point ; and this water becomes the first nourishment of the plant in early spring. The expansion of water during its congelation, at which time its volume increases...
Page 271 - And when the leaves are fully developed, the ground is shaded, and any injurious influence, which in the summer might be expected from too great a heat, entirely prevented ; so that the temperature of the surface, when bare and exposed to the rays of the sun, affords at least one indication of the degrees of its fertility; and the thermometer may be sometimes a useful instrument to the purchaser or improver of lands.
Page 283 - The great object in the application of manure should be to make it afford as much soluble matter as possible to the roots of the plant : and that in a slow and gradual manner, so that it may be entirely consumed in forming its sap and organised parts.
Page 231 - In the same manner the flowering has its regular time : the mezereon and snowdrop push forth their flowers in February ; the primrose in the month of March ; the cowslip in April ; the great mass of plants in May and June; many in July, August, and September ; some not till the month of October, as the meadow saffron ; and some not till the approach and arrival of winter, as the laurustinus and arbutus.
Page 102 - ... yet upon the whole be very agreeable. Something of this I have seen in some places, but heard more of it from others who have lived much among the Chineses; a people whose way of thinking seems to lie as wide of ours in Europe, as their country does.

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