An Encyclopaedia of Gardening, comprehending the theory and practice of horticulture, floriculture, arboriculture and landscape gardening including ... a general history of gardening in all countries, etc

Front Cover
Longman, 1822 - 1469 pages
 

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Inaccuracies.
It is stated that "Richard Steele was the gardener of Sion Hall, North Yorkshire" when in fact he was the eldest son of the property owner - Metcalfe Graham Steele, an attorney of
note.
Richard was also trained as an attorney, but turned his back on law in favour of farming.
Pauline Yates
5x gt grandaughter of Richard Steele
 

Contents

PART II
120
Names of Classes and Orders
135
Artificial System of Linnĉus 144
144
Natural Method of Jussieu
157
Imperfect Plants
166
Composite Organs
173
Vegetable Chemistry or primary Principles of Plants
176
15
181
Simple Products
193
Process of Nutrition
202
Process of Vegetable Developement
212
Anomalies of Vegetable Developement
218
Changes consequent upon Impregnation
225
Diseases
236
Physical Distribution of Vegetables
243
Systematic Distribution of Vegetables
249
CHAP XI
261
Of the Analysis and constituent Parts of Soils
267
Of the Improvement of Soils
273
Rotation of Crops
280
Or Manures of Mineral Origin
293
Of the specific Application of fermentative and Fossil or Saline
299
Of the Climate of Britain
310
Instruments
318
Utensils
327
Miscellaneous Articles used in Gardening
339
Fixed Structures
347
Decorative Buildings
393
Of the Improvement of the Mechanical Agents of Gardening
405
Operations of Gardening in which Strength is chiefly required in the Operator
407
Of transferring Designs from Ground to Paper or Mernory
417
Of carrying Designs into Execution
423
Operations of Propagation
431
Operations of Rearing and Culture
445
Operations for retarding or accelerating Vegetation
463
Operations of Protection from Injuries Insects and Diseases
471
Of the Superintendence and Management of Gardens
480
Of the Beauty and Order of Garden Scenery
486
Extent
492
Water
498
RingFence and Slip
508
Of the Selection and Arrangement of Espaliers and Dwarf
516
Pruning and Training
531
Vermin Insects Diseases and Accidents
537
Of Gathering and Storing Orchard Fruits
543
Vinery
549
Details in the Construction of Culinary HotHouses
555

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 7 - God Almighty first planted a garden; and, indeed, it is the purest of human pleasures. It is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man; without which buildings and palaces are but gross...
Page 71 - At that moment appeared Kent, painter enough to taste the charms of landscape, bold and opinionative enough to dare and to dictate, and born with a genius to strike out a great system from the twilight of imperfect essays.
Page 306 - ... thought them liable to be injured. But, when I had learned, that bodies on the surface of the earth become, during a still and serene night, colder than the atmosphere, by radiating their heat to the heavens, I perceived immediately a just reason for the practice, which I had before deemed useleu. Being desirous, however, of acquiring some precise information on this subject...
Page 294 - ... situation in which it is kept, is of importance. It should, if possible, be defended from the sun. To preserve it under sheds would be of great use ; or to make the site of a dunghill on the north side of a wall. The floor on which the dung is heaped should, if possible, be paved with flat stones ; and there should be a little inclination from each side towards the centre, in which there should be drains connected with a small well, furnished with a pump, by which any fluid matter may be collected...
Page 296 - When lime, whether freshly burnt or slacked, is mixed with any moist fibrous vegetable matter, there is a strong action between the lime and the vegetable matter, and they form a kind of compost together, of which a part is usually soluble in water. By this kind of operation, lime renders matter which was before comparatively inert nutritive...
Page 309 - Snow and ice are bad conductors of heat ; and when the ground is covered with snow, or the surface of the soil or of water is frozen, the roots or bulbs of the plants beneath are protected by the congealed water from the influence of the atmosphere, the temperature of which in northern winters is usually very much below the freezing point ; and this water becomes the first nourishment of the plant in early spring. The expansion of water during its congelation, at which time its volume increases...
Page 273 - And when the leaves are fully developed, the ground is shaded, and any injurious influence, which in the summer might be expected from too great a heat, entirely prevented ; so that the temperature of the surface, when bare and exposed to the rays of the sun, affords at least one indication of the degrees of its fertility; and the thermometer may be sometimes a useful instrument to the purchaser or improver of lands.
Page 285 - The great object in the application of manure should be to make it afford as much soluble matter as possible to the roots of the plant : and that in a slow and gradual manner, so that it may be entirely consumed in forming its sap and organised parts.
Page 233 - In the same manner the flowering has its regular time : the mezereon and snowdrop push forth their flowers in February ; the primrose in the month of March ; the cowslip in April ; the great mass of plants in May and June; many in July, August, and September ; some not till the month of October, as the meadow saffron ; and some not till the approach and arrival of winter, as the laurustinus and arbutus.
Page 104 - ... yet upon the whole be very agreeable. Something of this I have seen in some places, but heard more of it from others who have lived much among the Chineses; a people whose way of thinking seems to lie as wide of ours in Europe, as their country does.

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