The Holocaust on Trial

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W. W. Norton & Company, 2002 - History - 336 pages
2 Reviews
In 1999 David Irving, a right-wing chronicler of Hitler's regime, sued Penguin Books, claiming he had been falsely labelled a Holocaust denier in a book by the American professor Deborah Lipstadt. He maintained that there had been no gas chambers at Auschwitz, no systematic mass murder of Jews by the Nazis, and that the whole Holocaust story is exaggerated. The story of the trial is at the centre of this book. It is a true courtroom drama. Irving is a flamboyant and self publicising character, given to provocative pronouncements. He conducted his own case. D. D. Guttenplan had complete access to the courtroom and to Irving throughout the trial, and his rounded portrait of the man is as devastating as it is fair-minded. But Irving is only one of the book's characters, who include Charles Gray, the patrician judge, Anthony Julius, solicitor and iconoclastic scholar, Richard Rampton, Penguin's sharp-minded QC, and Professor Richard Evans, who spent twenty-eight hours in the witness box demolishing Irving's scholarship." "This is also a book about the wider debate over the Holocaust and about the nature of historical truth. Guttenplan insists that we cannot close off discussion of the Holocaust, even as it needs to be defended from so-called revisionists.
 

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User Review  - Chrisethier - LibraryThing

Update - Re-read in 2016. Love Guttenplan's even handedness and analysis about the issues. Honesty, this is a really good overview of the trial. This book is about the Irving vs. Penguin/Lipstadt ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - queensheherezade - LibraryThing

This is quite a rewarding read if you can persevere through the extensive historical detail given during the course of this momentous trial. This book was a prescribed text for a subject I took in law ... Read full review

Contents

Court Full
17
The Claimant
36
The Defendants
58
Discovery
83
A paper Eichmann?
106
Mr Death
138
Auschwitz
162
Massive confrontation
196
Germans
235
Closing arguments
255
A reasoned judgment
273
Numbers
287
Afterword
309
Notes
317
Index
326
Copyright

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Page 12 - And even if some proof should remain and some of you survive, people will say that the events you describe are too monstrous to be believed.
Page 12 - I said nothing. Then they came for the Social Democrats, but I was not a Social Democrat — so I did nothing.

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About the author (2002)

D. D. Guttenplan, journalist and essayist, lives in London.

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