Augustus: The Life of Rome's First Emperor

Front Cover
Random House Publishing Group, Oct 17, 2006 - History - 416 pages
2 Reviews
He found Rome made of clay and left it made of marble. As Rome’s first emperor, Augustus transformed the unruly Republic into the greatest empire the world had ever seen. His consolidation and expansion of Roman power two thousand years ago laid the foundations, for all of Western history to follow. Yet, despite Augustus’s accomplishments, very few biographers have concentrated on the man himself, instead choosing to chronicle the age in which he lived. Here, Anthony Everitt, the bestselling author of Cicero, gives a spellbinding and intimate account of his illustrious subject.

Augustus began his career as an inexperienced teenager plucked from his studies to take center stage in the drama of Roman politics, assisted by two school friends, Agrippa and Maecenas. Augustus’s rise to power began with the assassination of his great-uncle and adoptive father, Julius Caesar, and culminated in the titanic duel with Mark Antony and Cleopatra.
The world that made Augustus–and that he himself later remade–was driven by intrigue, sex, ceremony, violence, scandal, and naked ambition. Everitt has taken some of the household names of history–Caesar, Brutus, Cassius, Antony, Cleopatra–whom few know the full truth about, and turned them into flesh-and-blood human beings.

At a time when many consider America an empire, this stunning portrait of the greatest emperor who ever lived makes for enlightening and engrossing reading. Everitt brings to life the world of a giant, rendered faithfully and sympathetically in human scale. A study of power and political genius, Augustus is a vivid, compelling biography of one of the most important rulers in history.


From the Hardcover edition.
 

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AUGUSTUS: The Life of Rome's First Emperor

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

On balance, the 44-year reign of Caesar Augustus (63 b.c.-a.d. 14) had positive effects on Rome and its population. Unless . . .Unless, of course, you were a slave, a woman, a resident of some distant ... Read full review

Excellent follow up to Cicero

User Review  - Divamoon57 - Borders

I have always been an ancient history geek, from the time I picked up a copy of D'Aulaire's Book of Greek Myths in third grade in 1966. I picked up Augustus after viewing HBO's Rome. This biography is ... Read full review

Contents

THE GREAruncle
16
A PoliticAL MASTER CLAss
29
FROM Victory DEFEAT
65
will Divid ED WORLD
97
FIGHTING NEPTun E
126
A LoNG FAR Ew ELL
186
xvil WHoM THE Gods LovE
212
GRow ING THE EMPIRE
261
A FAMILY AT WAR
278
THE UN HAPPY RETURN
292
THE BITTER END 3 03
303
Sources
357
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About the author (2006)

Anthony Everitt, visiting professor in the visual and performing arts at Nottingham Trent University, has written extensively on European culture, has contributed to The Guardian and Financial Times, and is the author of Cicero. He once served as secretary general of the Arts Council of Great Britain. Everitt lives near Colchester, England’s first recorded town, founded by the Romans.


From the Hardcover edition.

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