The Rome that Did Not Fall: The Survival of the East in the Fifth Century

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Psychology Press, 1999 - History - 282 pages
The Rome that Did Not Fall provides a well-illustrated, comprehensive narrative and analysis of the Roman empire in the east, charting its remarkable growth and development which resulted in the distinct and enduring civilization of Byzantium. It considers:
* the fourth century background
* the invasions of Attila
* the resources of the east
* the struggle for stability
* the achievements of Anastasius.
 

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Contents

Crisis and partition
5
The fourthcentury background
15
Fortunes of East and West
20
The Western warlords
41
A changing state
47
On the defensive
61
The shock of Attila
63
Resistance and recovery
78
The struggle for stability
171
Imperial conflicts
173
Eastern chaos Western extinction
184
Stability attained
201
The achievements of Anastasius
203
The survival and renewal of the East
224
List of emperors
243
The Theodosian dynasty
244

The resources
95
Military developments East and West
97
Imperial wealth and expenditure
118
Centralised power
141
The Godprotected state
156
Notes
246
Bibliography
266
Index
275
Copyright

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Page v - But the subjects of the Byzantine empire, who assume and dishonour the names both of Greeks and Romans, present a dead uniformity of abject vices, which are neither softened by the weakness of humanity nor animated by the vigour of memorable crimes.
Page v - Western parts and the evolution of the medieval Western European world. They have tended to forget, or to brush aside, one very important fact, that the Roman Empire, though it may have declined, did not fall in the fifth century nor indeed for another thousand years. During the fifth century while the Western parts were being parcelled out into a group of barbarian kingdoms, the East stood its ground.

About the author (1999)

Stephen Williams is a freelance writer and until recently was Head of Public Relations at English Heritage. Gerard Friell works for English Heritage as Inspector of Ancient Monuments with particular responsiblity for Hadrian's Wall. They are the authors of Theodosius: The Empire at Bay.

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