First part of King Henry VI, by Shakespeare (?) Second part of King Henry VI, by Shakespeare (?) Third part of King Henry VI, by Shakespeare (?) King Edward IV, by Heywood. King Richard III, by Shakespeare. Perkin Warbeck, by Ford. King Henry VIII, by Shakespeare and Fletcher

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Macmillan and Company, Limited, 1896
 

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Página 464 - O, father abbot, An old man, broken with the storms of state, Is come to lay his weary bones among ye ; Give him a little earth for charity...
Página 251 - Deform'd, unfinish'd, sent before my time Into this breathing world, scarce half made up, And that so lamely and unfashionable That dogs bark at me as I halt by them...
Página 259 - I have pass'da miserable night, So full of fearful dreams, of ugly sights, That, as I am a Christian faithful man, I would not spend another such a night, Though 'twere to buy a world of happy days : So full of dismal terror was the time.
Página 320 - My conscience hath a thousand several tongues, And every tongue brings in a several tale, And every tale condemns me for a villain. Perjury, perjury, in the high'st degree, Murder, stern murder, in the dir'st degree ; All several sins, all used in each degree, Throng to the bar, crying all, — Guilty ! guilty ! I shall despair.
Página 95 - Be brave, then ; for your captain is brave, and vows reformation. There shall be in England seven halfpenny loaves sold for a penny ; the three-hooped pot shall have ten hoops ; and I will make it felony to drink small beer...
Página 441 - Orpheus with his lute made trees. And the mountain-tops that freeze, Bow themselves, when he did sing : To his music plants, and flowers Ever sprung ; as sun and showers There had made a lasting spring. Everything that heard him play. Even the billows of the sea, Hung their heads, and then lay by. In sweet music is such art, Killing care and grief of heart Fall asleep, or, hearing, die.
Página 260 - All scatter'd in the bottom of the sea. Some lay in dead men's skulls; and, in those holes Where eyes did once inhabit, there were crept (As 'twere in scorn of eyes,) reflecting gems, That woo'd the slimy bottom of the deep, And mock'd the dead bones that lay scatter'd by.
Página 133 - God ! methinks, it were a happy life, To be no better than a homely swain ; To sit upon a hill, as I do now, To carve out dials quaintly, point by point, Thereby to see the minutes how they run : How many make the hour full complete, How many hours bring about the day, How many days will finish up the year, How many years a mortal man may live. When this is known, then to divide the times : So many hours must I tend my flock ; So many hours must I take my rest ; So many hours must I contemplate ;...
Página 457 - Farewell ! a long farewell, to all my greatness ! This is the state of man : to-day he puts forth The tender leaves of hope, to-morrow blossoms, And bears his blushing honours thick upon him : The third day comes a frost, a killing frost, And, — when he thinks, good easy man, full surely His greatness is a-ripening, — nips his root, And then he falls, as I do.
Página 260 - And was embark'd to cross to Burgundy, And, in my company, my brother Gloster : Who from my cabin tempted me to walk Upon the hatches, thence we look'd toward England, And cited up a thousand heavy times, During the wars of York and Lancaster, That had befallen us.

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