Transactions of the Asiatic Society of Japan

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The Society, 1888 - Japan
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Page 154 - FRS, in the Chair. The minutes of the last meeting having been read and approved, The CHAIRMAN...
Page 112 - Bune, and because they found no inhabitants upon it they marked it with the character of an uninhabited island. On the shores they found an incredible quantity of fish and crabs, some of which were from four to six feet long.
Page 133 - Suppose for a moment that there were no electricity whatever in the air — that the air was absolutely devoid of all electric manifestation, and that a charge of electricity were given to the whole earth. For this no great amount would be necessary. Such amounts as we deal with in our great submarine cables would, if given to the earth as a whole, produce a very considerable electrification of its whole surface.
Page 36 - ... that mercury comes out of cinnabar. When told, they still refuse to believe it, saying that cinnabar is red, and how can it produce a white substance? They say also that cinnabar is a stone, — that stones when heated turn to ashes, and how then can anything else be expected of cinnabar? They cannot even reach this simple truth, much less can it be said of them, that they have been instructed in the doctrine of the genii.
Page 36 - ... to heat, it produces mercury. After passing through other changes, it returns to its original form. It differs widely, therefore, from vegetable substances, and hence it has the power of making men live for ever, and raising them to the rank of the genii. He who knows this doctrine, is he not far above common men? In the world there are few that know it, and many that cavil at it. Many do not even know that mercury comes out of cinnabar. When told, they still refuse to believe it, saying that...
Page 82 - ... shapely at the ends. The wood is singularly inelastic. The arrows (of which I have obtained a number) are very peculiar, and are made in three pieces, the point consisting of a sharpened piece of bone with an elongated cavity on one side for the reception of the poison. This point or head is very slightly fastened by a lashing of bark to a fusiform piece of bone about four inches long, which is in its turn lashed to a shaft about fourteen inches long, the other end of which is sometimes equipped...
Page 182 - There is every reason to consider it established, that an earthquake is simply " the transit of a wave or waves of elastic compression in any direction, from vertically upwards to horizontally in any azimuth, through the crust and surface of the earth, from any centre of impulse or from more than one, and which may be attended with sound and tidal waves, dependent upon the impulse and upon circumstances of position as to sea and land.
Page 39 - ... bronze or copper) and water. Thus well prepared the blackish paste in the frame receives the concave designs by the aid of woodcuts, cut " in relief." The two halves of the mould are put together in the frame and dried. Several of these flat moulds are then placed in a smelting box, made of clay and cJiamotte.
Page 112 - Hachijo, from which they computed it to be 300 miles distant toward the east. They met with no inhabitants, but found it to be a very pleasant and fruitful country, well supplied with fresh water and furnished with plenty of plants and trees, particularly the Arrack tree, which, however, might give room to conjecture that the island lay rather to the south of Japan than to the east, these trees growing only in hot countries. They...
Page 111 - Fatsisio, from which they computed it to be three hundred miles distant towards the east. They met with no inhabitants, but found it to be a very pleasant and fruitful country, well supplied with fresh water, and furnished with plenty of plants and trees, particularly the arrack tree, which, however...

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