The universal sea language, a complete code of signals, tr. by H.B. Daherup

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1835
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Page vi - ... last, when I had an interview with Lord Auckland, that their report on this interesting subject was obtained: this could not but be favourable, and the usual number of copies were subscribed for, as also by the Hon. East India Company, the Committee of Lloyd's, Corporation of the Trinity-house, &c., and at length the English edition is in progress. The French edition, which is also a translation from the original Danish, has been already printed, the government having subscribed for no less than...
Page ix - SIR, — I have received and laid before the Court of Directors of the East India Company, your letter (No.
Page vi - ... communications of any and of every kind may be made by an English vessel to a foreign one, and vice versa, without the least knowledge, and under circumstances of peril and distress which have rendered every other mode impracticable. Again, those on the sea-coast who would wish to save their fellow creatures from a watery grave, might point out to the stranger an unknown harbour or creek, or the best place to run on shore, and by these invaluable signals convey to a perishing crew of any nation...
Page vi - ... edition is in progress. The French edition, which is also a translation from the original Danish, has been already printed, the government having subscribed for no less than 200 copies. The German and Spanish translations are soon to follow. The advantages of this method of communication by signal, over every other, are briefly these : — In the first place it will be found by far the cheapest, the whole expense being the price of the book, which is only sixteen shillings, the purchase of flags...
Page vi - ... convey to a perishing crew of any nation every information required to assist their humane endeavours; while, on the other hand, the crew of a stranded ship might convey to the spectators of their perilous situation everything that is requisite, even the perishing foreigner's last farewell to relations and friends. I can safely assure the section, that during my services in his Majesty's navy, of above forty years, had I been in possession of these signals, and had they been generally distributed...
Page vi - ... required on board any ship are the flags under which she sails, jack, ensign, and pendant (the colour being immaterial), and two white flags, for which two table-cloths, or, if there are none on board, two shirts," or anything that will represent a flag will suffice ; so that everything required is to be found even in the smallest craft. By these simple and ready means, communications of any and of every kind may be made by an English vessel to a foreign one, and vice versa, without the least...
Page v - Proceedings, according to the existing regulations, as referring to a printed work : — This universal sea language is a complete system of communications between the crews of ships of different nations, without any knowledge of each other's language. This ingenious and simple code of signals was first communicated to me by the gallant inventor, Captain Rhode, of the Royal Danish Navy, at Copenhagen, in July, 1834 ; and, in September last, I had the honour of submitting the English MS.
Page vi - ... farewell to relations and friends. I can safely assure the section, that during my services in his Majesty's navy, of above forty years, had I been in possession of these signals, and had they been generally distributed and published in different languages, as they are now intended to be, I should have witnessed the saving of hundreds of lives, and thousands of pounds in valuable property. VARIETIES. The Report of the Committee on Orange Institutions, which has been presented to the House of...
Page vi - ... shirts," or anything that will represent a flag will suffice ; so that everything required is to be found even in the smallest craft. By these simple and ready means, communications of any and of every kind may be made by an English vessel to a foreign one, and vice versa, without the least knowledge, and under circumstances of peril and distress which have rendered every other mode impracticable. Again, those on the sea-coast who would wish to save their fellow creatures from a watery grave,...
Page v - This is a revised version of a paper presented at the British Association for the Advancement of Science in 1982.

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