Miss Gilbert's Career: An American Story

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C. Scribner's Sons, 1882 - Cities and towns - 405 pages
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Page 163 - Thou art, O God! the life and light Of all this wondrous world we see; Its glow by day, its smile by night, Are but reflections caught from Thee." Ah! yes. Fanny's heart was greedy for the praise of men—thirsting for the adoration of the world—and it was dry. Her
Page 188 - think of it," responded the young man. The doctor had listened to this business conversation in silent astonishment. The reformer watched the pair with burning eyes, and coming up to the young man, he extended toward him his long, thin finger, and said : " Through covetousness shall they with feigned words make merchandise of you, whose judgment now of a long time lingereth not, and their damnation slumbcreth not.
Page 205 - friend with her usual frankness and cordiality. " Fanny has been to see you ? " said the doctor. " Yes." " And read to you Mr. Sargent's letter, I suppose." " Yes." " What do you think of it ? " " It seems to me to be the letter of a man who has a sharp eye
Page 320 - by Mary, told her that the night would probably decide her father's fate. She gathered from the expression of his face and the tone of his voice, that, in his judgment, the event was problematical. Up to this time she had not consented that his
Page 6 - There shall be no more thence an infant of days — for the child shall die a hundred years old.
Page 30 - There shall be no more thence an infant of days for the child shall die a hundred years old.
Page 80 - from the mill when the sun rose, fresh and bright, above the eastern hills. The tall chimney was vomiting forth thick masses of black smoke, the hum of machinery with the pulsating din of many looms filled the air, and a few minutes' walk brought him to the brow of the hill, at the foot of which lay the factory and the little hamlet of Hucklebury
Page 13 - suppressed titter—when precious little Venus, in a shrill voice, with an exceedingly knowing look in her face, said that " Joan of Arc was the name of the dog that Noah saved from the flood !" What wonder that Crampton roared with laughter
Page 37 - suppressed titter—when precious little Venus, in a shrill voice, with an exceedingly knowing look in her face, said that "Joan of Arc was the name of the dog that Noah saved from the flood !" What wonder that Crampton roared with laughter
Page 205 - Hem! I thank you. It has always been a comfort to me to know that you were together. By the way, how is my little boy getting

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