Autism in Adolescents and Adults

Front Cover
Eric Schopler, Gary B. Mesibov
Springer Science & Business Media, Feb 28, 1983 - Psychology - 438 pages
4 Reviews
The state of North Carolina has had a longstanding concern and com mitment to the understanding and treatment of autistic, communications handicapped children and their families. This commitment found expres sion in the only comprehensive statewide program for families confronted with this disability, Division for the Treatment and Education of Autistic and related Communication handicapped CHildren (Division TEACCH). Our program staff has been privileged to respond to this commitment by developing and providing the needed services, and to engage in research informed by our clinical experience. Although many of the problems con cerning these developmentally disabled children remain to be solved, substantial progress has been made during this past decade of collabo ration among professionals, parents, and their government representa tives. The TEACCH staff has resolved to mark the effectiveness of this collaboration by holding a series of annual conferences focused on the several major issues confronting these children and their families. The conferences are held in order to bring together the best research knowl edge available to us from throughout the country, and to encourage par ticipation by the different professional disciplines and concerned parents. In addition these annual meetings form the basis for a series of books based on the conference theme. These books are, however, not merely the published proceedings of the presented papers: some chapters are expanded from conference presentations and many others were solicited from experts in the related areas of research and their service application.
 

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This book is a great history lesson in the development of understanding about autism spectrum disorders, and is a testament to how far research and services in the field have come. This book contains lots of information about what general thinking and services used to be like, in an era when still little was understood about these disorders.
These authors have published more recent books and articles related to more current research and thinking about these disorders; if you are interested in more recent writing, look for those.
To respond to previous reviewers- you must bear in mind (as you noted, but did not seem to take into account) that this book was published in 1983, when very little was known about autism. And to respond to a previous reviewer, at the time this book was published, the DSM did use the word "retardation" as a diagnostic term. This book is best viewed at this point as a history lesson in the development of understanding about the disorder. If you were to speak with these authors and contributors today I am sure they would have much more to say. In fact, they do- they've published many more subsequent books and articles. So please read this book in the context in which it was written- a very different public climate and point of understanding about Autism Spectrum Disorders.
 

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Given the publication date of this material, including a reference from the 1940s', it is no wonder that the content is inadequate on many levels and downright degrading. We do not even use the term "retardation" any more, as the DSM changed the term to developmental disability. I do not like this information at all. 

Contents

INTRODUCTION CAN AN ADOLESCENT OR ADULT HAVE AUTISM?
3
A DEVELOPMENTAL PERSPECTIVE OF ADOLESCENCE
11
PHYSICAL ASPECTS OF ADOLESCENCE
12
COGNITIVE ASPECTS OF ADOLESCENCE
19
SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL ASPECTS OF ADOLESCENCE
24
THE AUTISTIC ADOLESCENT
32
REFERENCES
33
CURRENT PERSPECTIVES AND ISSUES IN AUTISM AND ADOLESCENCE
37
GENERALIZING AND MAINTAINING IMPROVEMENT
214
SUMMARY
217
REFERENCES
218
FAMILY PERSPECTIVES
223
FAMILY NEEDS OF THE AUTISTIC ADOLESCENT
225
QUESTIONNAIRE
226
RESULTS
227
SECTION 1 ADVERSE EFFECTS OF LIVING WITH AN AUTISTIC FAMILY MEMBER
228

LITERATURE REVIEW SUMMARY AND DISCUSSION
42
PROGRAMMATIC NEEDS
43
CONCLUSION
50
REFERENCES
51
INDIVIDUAL NEEDS
55
LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION NEEDS OF ADOLESCENTS WITH AUTISM
57
CHARACTERISTICS OF LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION IN ADOLESCENTS WITH AUTISM
59
CURRENT APPROACHES TO LANGUAGE INTERVENTION
66
ALTERNATIVE COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES
71
SOCIAL SKILLS TRAINING
73
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
74
REFERENCES
75
THE EDUCATION NEEDS OF THE AUTISTIC ADOLESCENT
79
CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTISTIC ADOLESCENTS THAT IMPACT ON EDUCATION
80
CHARACTERISTICS OF THE EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT
84
ARRANGING THE EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT
86
CURRICULUM
96
SUMMARY
106
RECREATION AND LEISURE NEEDS
111
DEFINITION AND RATIONALE Definition
112
CHARACTERISTICS OF AN APPROPRIATE LEISURE SKILLS PROGRAM
115
A TRAINERADVOCACY APPROACH TO COMMUNITYBASED RECREATION
122
CONCLUSION
130
SCHOOL DOESNT LAST FOREVER THEN WHAT? SOME VOCATIONAL ALTERNATIVES
133
AVAILABLE VOCATIONAL OPTIONS
134
COMPONENTS OF A HABILIATION PROGRAM
137
TECHNOLOGY FOR IMPLEMENTATION
142
CONCLUSION
146
REFERENCES
147
MEDICAL NEEDS OF THE AUTISTIC ADOLESCENT
149
MEDICAL ASSESSMENT
150
PREVENTIVE MEDICAL CARE
151
DEVIATIONS IN GROWTH PATTERNS AND SEXUAL MATURATION
152
DISORDERS AND PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH REPRODUCTIVE FUNCTION
155
NUTRITION
157
INFECTIONS
158
ALLERGIES
159
TREATMENT WITH PSYCHOPHARMACOLOCIC AGENTS
160
SEIZURES
165
CONCLUSION
166
REFERENCES
167
SEX EDUCATION AT BENHAVEN
169
POLICIES
171
DEVELOPING THE PROGRAM
175
SEX EDUCATION CURRICULUM
176
PROGRAM CONSIDERATIONS
181
PROGRAM STRATEGIES
183
EVALUATION AND ASSESSMENT
184
CONCLUSION
186
THE MANAGEMENT OF AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR
187
DESCRIBING THE SEVERITY OF AGGRESSION
188
FACTORS MAINTAINING AGGRESSION
189
THE GOAL OF TREATMENT
191
THE USE OF PSYCHOTROPIC DRUGS
212
DEALING WITH COLLATERAL CHANGES IN BEHAVIOR
213
SECTION 2 NEEDS OF FAMILY MEMBERS
237
SUMMARY
249
REFERENCES
250
STRESS AND COPING IN FAMILIES OF AUTISTIC ADOLESCENTS
251
GENERAL PROBLEMS OF ADOLESCENCE
253
SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN FAMILIES OF HANDICAPPED CHILDREN Mothers
254
STRESSES IN FAMILIES OF AUTISTIC CHILDREN
255
GENERAL FAMILY COPING WITH STRESS
261
SUCCESSFUL COPING IN FAMILIES OF AUTISTIC CHILDREN
262
SUMMARY
274
REFERENCES
276
GROWING OUT OF AUTISM
279
PARENTAL PERSPECTIVE OF NEEDS
297
A PLACE TO LIVE
300
BODILY NURTURE
304
JOY IN LIVING
306
SELFESTEEM AND ACCEPTANCE
311
FREEDOM FROM SUFFERING AND ABUSE
314
SUMMARY
316
REFERENCES
317
LEGAL NEEDS
319
LITIGATION AND ADVOCACY
320
GUARDIANSHIP
322
PARENTAL ESTATE PLANNING
331
CONCLUSION
334
SOCIAL AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS
335
SOCIAL AND INTERPERSONAL NEEDS
337
CLINICAL CLASSIFICATION
339
SOCIAL PROBLEMS OF DIFFERENT SUBGROUPS
341
PSYCHIATRIC PROBLEMS
345
IMPROVING SOCIAL SKILLS
346
PROVISION OF SERVICES
349
REFERENCES
353
BENHAVEN
355
PROGRAMS AT BENHAVEN
357
STAFF
365
TEACHING TECHNIQUES
366
WHAT HAS NOT WORKED
371
GENERAL ISSUES
373
REFERENCES
379
THE JAY NOLAN CENTER A COMMUNITYBASED PROGRAM
381
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
385
CONCLUSION
408
REFERENCES
410
SERVICE DEVELOPMENT FOR ADOLESCENTS AND ADULTS IN NORTH CAROLINAS TEACCH PROGRAM
411
THE CONCEPT OF DEVELOPMENT
413
DIAGNOSTIC EVALUATION AND ASSESSMENT
415
PARENTPROFESSIONAL COLLABORATION
418
APPROPRIATE SMALL STRUCTURED CLASSROOMS
421
NEED FOR SPECIALIZED SERVICES
427
SUMMARY
430
REFERENCES
431
INDEX
433
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