The Artizan, Volume 26

Front Cover
Simpkin, Marshall, and Company, 1868 - Technology
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Page 120 - That gravity should be innate, inherent, and essential to matter, so that one body may act upon another at a distance through a vacuum, without the mediation of anything else, by and through which their action and force may be conveyed from one to another, is to me so great an absurdity, that I believe no man, who has in philosophical matters a competent faculty of thinking, can ever fall into it.
Page 142 - This index of refraction is still more materially affected when a body passes from the solid to the liquid, or from the liquid to the gaseous condition...
Page 120 - ... action and force may be conveyed from one to another, is to me so great an absurdity, that I believe no man who has in philosophical matters a competent faculty of thinking can ever fall into it. Gravity must be caused by an agent acting constantly according to certain laws ; but whether this agent be material or immaterial I have left to the consideration of my readers."* Faraday does not see the same difficulty in his contiguous particles.
Page 120 - ... no other force in nature. We have many processes by which the form of the power may be so changed, that an apparent conversion of one into the other takes place. So we can change chemical force into the electric current, or the current into chemical force. The beautiful experiments of Seebeck and Peltier show the convertibility of heat and electricity ; and others by Oersted and myself show the convertibility of electricity and magnetism. But i/n, no case, not even in those of the Gymnotus and...
Page 120 - I have long held an opinion, almost amounting to conviction, in common I believe with many other lovers of natural knowledge, that the various forms under which the forces of matter are made manifest have one common origin; or, in other words, are so directly related and mutually dependent, that they are convertible, as it were, one into another, and possess equivalents of power in their action.
Page 72 - More Worlds than One. The Creed of the Philosopher and the Hope of the Christian.
Page 94 - ... when the disk was turned round a constant flow of electricity. The direction of the current was determined by the direction of the motion, the current being reversed when the rotation was reversed. He now states the law which rules the production of currents in both disks and wires, and in so doing uses for the first time a phrase which has since become famous. When iron filings are scattered over a magnet, the particles of iron arrange themselves in certain determinate lines called magnetic...
Page 120 - ... good or bad, through which the current passes, and that again of the electrolytic action where bodies are decomposed by it, can arise out of nothing ; that without any change in the acting matter, or the consumption of any / generating force, a current shall be produced which shall ' go on for ever against a constant resistance, or only be stopped, as in the voltaic trough, by the ruins which its exertion has heaped up in its own course. This would indeed be a creation of power, and is like no...
Page 118 - If a line be imagined passing from Dover to Calais through the sea, and returning through the land, beneath the water, to Dover, it traces out a circuit of conducting matter one part of which, when the water moves up or down the channel, is cutting the magnetic curves of the earth, whilst the other is relatively at rest.
Page 140 - Few living men are aware of the difficulty of obtaining results like this, or of the delicacy necessary to their attainment. ' But though it thus takes up the character of a force acting at a distance, still it is due to that power of the particles which makes them cohere in regular order and gives the mass its crystalline aggregation, which we call at other times the attraction of aggregation, and so often speak of as acting at insensible distances.

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