Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, Volume 1

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William Smith
Walton and Maberly, 1854 - Classical geography - 2491 pages
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Geografía imperio romano menlaria v

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Page 74 - Towards the end of the first or the beginning of the second century after Christ, these lands were incorporated in the Roman empire.
Page 310 - Santo end a good watering-place for shipping; the water (except in very dry weather) runs out in a good stream. The distance across is 2500 yards, which agrees very well with the breadth of twelve stadia assigned by Herodotus. The width of the canal appears to have been about 18 or 20 feet; the level of the earth nowhere exceeds 15 feet above the sea; the soil is a light clay. It is on the whole a very remarkable isthmus, for the land on each side (but more especially to the westward) rises abruptly...
Page 255 - Look once more ere we leave this specular mount Westward, much nearer by south-west, behold Where on the ^Egean shore a city stands Built nobly, pure the air, and light the soil ; Athens, the eye of Greece, mother of arts And eloquence...
Page 271 - ... columns in all. These columns were 6 feet 2 inches in diameter at the base, and 34 feet in height. The...
Page 271 - Parthenon, whether viewed at a small or at a great distance, there was nothing to divert the spectator's contemplation, from the simplicity and majesty of mass and outline, which forms the first and most remarkable object of admiration in a Greek temple...
Page 268 - Parthenon, ... no two are parallel. This asymmetria is productive of very great beauty; for it not only obviates the dry uniformity of too many parallel lines, but also produces exquisite varieties of light and shade.
Page 316 - Rhenumque bibunt. venient annis saecula seris, quibus Oceanus vincula rerum laxet et ingens pateat tellus Tethysque novos detegat orbes nee sit terris ultima Thule.
Page 268 - The facade of this temple and the pedestal of Agrippa (F), which is opposite to it, remain in shade for a considerable time after the front of the Propylaea has been lighted up, and they gradually receive every variety of light, until the sun is sufficiently on the decline to shine nearly equally on all the western faces of the entire group.
Page 273 - On both sides, and towards the door, is a kind of gallery, made with two ranks of pillars, twenty-two below, and twentythree above. The odd pillar is over the arch of the entrance, which was left for the passage.
Page 370 - ... varnish had been laid on to give a clearness of outline to each individual letter, and to protect the surface against the action of the elements. This varnish is of infinitely greater hardness than the limestone rock beneath it.

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