Mongolia in the Twentieth Century: Landlocked Cosmopolitan

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Stephen Kotkin, Bruce A. Elleman
M.E. Sharpe, 1999 - History - 313 pages
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The remote vastness of Mongolia has remained somewhat of a mystery to most Westerners - no less so in the 20th century. Homeland of the legendary conqueror Chingiz Khan, in modern times Mongolia itself has been the object of imperial rivalry. For most of the 20th century it was under Soviet domination. Mikhail Gorbachev began the withdrawal of Soviet troops from Mongolia in 1989, a process completed in 1992. By 1996 a coalition of opposition parties triumphed in national elections, and Mongolia launched itself on a new course. It is perhaps the most intriguing of the post-community "transition" societies. This volume examines Mongol history over the past century, embracing not only Mongolia proper but also Mongol communities in Russia and China. Contributions, based on new archival research and the latest fieldwork, are from the world's top experts in the field - including four authors from Mongolia and others from Japan, Russia, Taiwan, Great Britain and the United States. Stephen Kotkin's introductory chapter is an overview of Mongol studies. The essays in part 1 examine Sino-Russian competition over Outer Mongolia. Part 2 looks at international diplomacy in Mongolia, including the role of Japan. Part 3 focuses on contemporary issues ranging from economic and cultural change to emergent elites. A concluding essay surveys Mongolian foreign policy.
 

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Contents

SinoRussian Competition over Outer Mongolia
27
The 1910 Moscow
59
Russian Diplomats and Mongol Independence
69
The Buriat Alphabet of Agvan Dorzhiev
79
International Diplomacy Concerning Outer Mongolia
99
viii
123
SinoSoviet Diplomacy and the Second Partition
137
A Half
163
Mongolia Today
183
Mobility Technology and Decollectivization
223
The Revival
237
Nationalism Elites and Mongolias Rapid
247
Relations with
277
Selected Bibliography
291
Index
301
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About the author (1999)

Stephen Mark Kotkin was born on February 17, 1959. He is a historian, academic and author. Kotkin graduated from the University of Rochester in 1981 with a B.A. in English. He studied Russian and Soviet history under Reginald E. Zelnik and Martin Malia at the University of California, Berkeley, where he earned his M.A. in 1983 and his Ph.D. in 1988, both in history. Starting in 1986, Kotkin traveled to the former Soviet Union several times for academic research and fellowships. He was a visiting scholar at the Russian Academy of Sciences (1993, 1995, 1998, 1999, 2012). He joined the faculty at Princeton University in 1989, and was the director of in Russian and Eurasian Studies Program for 13 years (1995-2008). He is currently the John P. Birkelund '52 Professor in History and International Affairs at Princeton. He is also a W. Glenn Campbell and Rita Ricardo-Campbell National Fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution. He was a finalist for the 2015 Pulitzer Prize in Biography with his title Stalin - Vol. 1 : Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928.

Bruce A. Elleman is William V. Pratt Professor of International History in the Maritime History Department, Center for Naval Warfare Studies, U.S. Naval War College. He is the author of many books, including International Competition in China, 1899-1991: The Rise, Fall, and Restoration of the Open Door Policy (Routledge/Curzon Press, 2015); Navies and Soft Power: Historical Case Studies of Naval Power and the Non-use of Military Force, edited, with S.C.M. Paine (NWC Press, 2015); Taiwan Straits: Crisis in Asia and the Role of the U.S. Navy (Rowman & Littlefield, 2015)

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