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" Under whatever disguise it takes refuge, whether fungus or oak, worm or man, the living protoplasm not only ultimately dies and is resolved into its mineral and lifeless constituents, but is always dying, and, strange as the paradox may sound, could not... "
In Ghostly Japan - Page 190
by Lafcadio Hearn - 1899 - 241 pages
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The Christian observer [afterw.] The Christian observer and advocate

1869
...that melancholy line. Under whatever disguise it takes refuge, whether fungus or oak, worm or ma.^ the living protoplasm not only ultimately dies and...resolved into its mineral and lifeless constituents, bat is always dying, and, strange as the paradox may sound, could not live unless it died." After tracing...
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Catholic World, Volume 9

1869
...generated from corruption. " Under whatever disguise it takes refugf, whether fungus or oak, worm or man. the living protoplasm not only ultimately dies and...and, strange as the paradox may 'sound, could not live unless it died." We know that some physiologists regard the waste of the body, which in life is...
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The apology of an unbeliever. Transl

1869
...with wild De Maistre, " the earth continually fed with blood is but one huge altar, on which all that dies, and is resolved into its mineral and lifeless...; and, strange as the paradox may sound, could not live unless it died" (HuxLEY, in Fortnightly Review. February, 1869). * " By dint of a close study...
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On the Physical Basis of Life

Thomas Henry Huxley - Chalk - 1870 - 35 pages
...that melancholy line. Under whatever disguise it takes refuge, whether fungus or oak, worm or man, the living protoplasm not only ultimately dies and...dying, and, strange as the paradox may sound, could not live unless it died. In the wonderful story of the " Peau de Chagrin," the hero becomes possessed of...
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Lay Sermons, Addresses, and Reviews

Thomas Henry Huxley - Science - 1870 - 378 pages
...that melancholy line. Under whatever disguise it takes refuge, whether fungus or oak, worm or man, the living protoplasm not only ultimately dies and...dying, and, strange as the paradox may sound, could not live unless it died. In the wonderful story of the "Peau de Chagrin," the hero becomes possessed of...
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The Medical Examiner; a Semi-monthly Journal of Medical Sciences, Volume 11

Nathan Smith Davis - Medicine - 1870
...aggregated." Under whatever disguise it takes refuge — whether in the fungus, or oak, worm, or man — the living protoplasm not only ultimately dies and...but is always dying; and, strange as the paradox may seem, could not live unless it died. In fact, in living organisms more than elsewhere, we see exemplified...
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Half Hours with Modern Scientists, Volume 1

Science - 1871 - 288 pages
...that melancholy line. Under whatever disguise it takes refuge, whether fungus or oak, worm or man, the living protoplasm not only ultimately dies and...dying, and, strange as the paradox may sound, could not live unless it died. In the wonderful story of the " Peau de Chagrin," the hero becomes possessed of...
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Lay Sermons, Addresses, and Reviews

Thomas Henry Huxley - Natural history - 1871 - 344 pages
...takes refuge, whether fungus or oak, worm or man, the 1".3 ^aI» Sermons, (£ssags, anb gtbiefos. [vn living protoplasm not only ultimately dies and is...dying, and, strange as the paradox may sound, could not live unless it died. In the wonderful story of the "Peau de Chagrin," tiie hero becomes possessed of...
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The Origin, Tendencies and Principles of Government: Or, A Review of the ...

Victoria Claflin Woodhull - Industrial relations - 1871 - 247 pages
...animals have their origin in a particle of nucleated protoplasm, and that this protoplasm " not only dies and is resolved into its mineral and lifeless...but is always dying, and strange as the paradox may seem, could not live unless it died." Thus we are led to the conclusion that all matter has a common...
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Half Hours with Modern Scientists, Volume 1

Science - 1871 - 288 pages
...that melancholy line. Under whatever disguise it takes refuge, whether fungus or oak, worm or man, the living protoplasm not only ultimately dies and...mineral and lifeless constituents, but is always dying, arid, strange as the paradox may sound, could not live unless it died; In the wonderful story of the...
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