The Cambridge History of China

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Cambridge University Press, 1978 - History - 1203 pages
"The Cambridge History of China is the largest and most comprehensive history of China in the English language. Planned in the 1960s by the late, distinguished China scholar Professor John K. Fairbank of Harvard, and Denis Twitchett, Professor Emeritus of Princeton, the series covers the grand scale of Chinese history from the 3rd century BC, to the death of Mao Tse-tung. Consisting of fifteen volumes (two of which, Volumes 5 and 9 are to be published in two books), the history embodies both existing scholarship and extensive original research into hitherto neglected subjects and periods. The contributors, all specialists from the international community of Sinologists, cover the main developments in political, social, economic and intellectual life of China in their respective periods. Collectively they present the major events in a long history that encompasses both a very old civilisation and a great modern power. Written not only for students and scholars, but with the general reader in mind, the volumes are designed to be read continuously, or as works of reference. No knowledge of Chinese is necessary; for readers with Chinese, proper names and terms are identified with their characters in the glossary, and full references to Chinese, Japanese, and other works are given in the bibliographies. Numerous maps illustrate the texts. The published volumes have constituted essential reading in Chinese history. See also, The Cambridge History of Ancient China, Michael Loewe and Edward Shaughnessy, eds., a companion to this series covering the period 1500 to 221 BC. General Editors: John K. Fairbank, Denis Twitchett." --
 

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User Review  - ccjolliffe - LibraryThing

It would take a deeper dome than mine to dare to review a Cambridge history. These sets are generally regarded as the apotheosis of historical scholarship. I'm just happy to have one! Read full review

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User Review  - AndreasJ - LibraryThing

An excellent account of the conquest dynasties of the 10th to 14th centuries; Liao, Xi Xia, Jin, and Yuan. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Ming government
9
The personnel of government
16
The structure of government
72
The quality of Ming governance
103
Ming law
172
The Ming penal system
180
Ming legal procedure
188
Communications and commerce
579
Transport
603
Travel
619
The circulation of knowledge
635
Commerce
670
Confucian learning in late Ming thought
708
The Learning of the Way in late Ming
716
Other endeavors in learning by literati as Confucians
770

Legal education and professionalism
202
Conclusion
209
The Ming and Inner Asia
221
The Ming and the disunited land of the lamas
241
From Jurchens to Manchus
258
s SinoKorean tributary relations under the Ming
272
Tribute missions
279
The MingKoreanJurchen triangle
289
Korea and the fall of the Ming
299
Relations with maritime Europeans 1514 1662
333
Ming China and the emerging world economy c 1470 1650
376
Silver and the Ming monetary system 381 Silver and the Ming monetary system
388
Japanese silver and the expansion of SinoJapanese trade during
396
Foreign silver and the late Ming economy
403
The socioeconomic development of rural China during the Ming
417
the introduction of Christianity
789
Literati who associated themselves with the Learning from
810
Official religion in the Ming
840
Official religion
847
Conclusions
891
Buddhism in the early Ming period
899
Buddhism during the middle period of the Ming
918
Buddhism in the late Ming period
927
Buddhism in late Ming society
946
IS Taoism in Ming culture
953
Bibliographic notes
987
Bibliography
1005
Glossaryindex
1084
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