The Cambridge History of China: Volume 8, The Ming Dynasty, Part 2; Parts 1368-1644

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 28, 1998 - History - 1231 pages
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Volumes Seven and Eight of The Cambridge History of China are devoted to the Ming dynasty (1368-1644), providing the largest and most detailed account in any language. Summarizing all modern research, Volume Eight offers detailed studies of governmental structure, the fiscal and legal systems, international relations, social and economic history, transportation networks, and the history of ideas and religion. Although written by specialists, these volumes intend to explain and describe the Ming period to general readers without a specialized knowledge of Chinese history, as well as scholars and students.
 

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Contents

Introduction I
1
Ming government
9
Tables
14
Administrative geography 1
16
The structure of government
72
The quality of Ming governance
103
Fiscal organization and general practices
114
State revenues and their distributions
126
Figures
457
tax collection and the rural social order
458
changes in the fifteenth and sixteenth
477
Commercialization of the countryside
496
The agricultural response
516
Socioeconomic developments in the late Ming 5 5 2
552
Conclusion
575
State systems of communication and transportation
582

Readjustments in the sixteenth century and the final collapse
148
Conclusion
168
Ming law
172
The Ming penal system
180
Ming legal procedure
188
Legal education and professionalism
202
Conclusion
209
The Ming and Inner Asia
221
The Ming and the disunited land of the lamas
241
From Jurchens to Manchus 2 5 8
258
SinoKorean tributary relations under the Ming
272
Tribute missions
279
Other issues in MingKorean relations
289
Korea and the fall of the Ming
299
Relations with maritime Europeans 15141662
333
Ming China and the emerging world economy c 14701650
376
Mining in Central Europe and the New World and its impact
388
Japanese silver and the expansion of SinoJapanese trade during
396
1602 50
397
Foreign silver and the late Ming economy
403
The socioeconomic development of rural China during the Ming
417
Transport
603
Travel
619
The circulation of knowledge
635
Commerce
670
Confucian learning in late Ming thought
708
The Learning of the Way in late Ming
716
Other endeavors in learning by literati as Confucians
770
the introduction of Christianity
789
Literati who associated themselves with the Learning from
810
Official religion
847
Taoism and the great sacrifices
877
Conclusions
891
Buddhism in the early Ming period
899
Buddhism during the middle period of the Ming
918
Buddhism in the late Ming period
927
Buddhism in late Ming society
946
Taoism in Ming culture
953
Bibliographic notes
987
oo 5
1084
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