The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Sep 1, 2010 - Social Science - 224 pages
23 Reviews

In her award-winning book The Woman Warrior, Maxine Hong Kingston created an entirely new form—an exhilarating blend of autobiography and mythology, of world and self, of hot rage and cool analysis. First published in 1976, it has become a classic in its innovative portrayal of multiple and intersecting identities—immigrant, female, Chinese, American.

As a girl, Kingston lives in two confounding worlds: the California to which her parents have immigrated and the China of her mother’s “talk stories.” The fierce and wily women warriors of her mother’s tales clash jarringly with the harsh reality of female oppression out of which they come. Kingston’s sense of self emerges in the mystifying gaps in these stories, which she learns to fill with stories of her own. A warrior of words, she forges fractured myths and memories into an incandescent whole, achieving a new understanding of her family’s past and her own present.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mirikayla - LibraryThing

I really only finished half of this, but I can tell I'm done for now. I'm having a hard time with all the ghost stuff that's so common in Chinese culture; it's so irrational to me and this is very ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - dbsovereign - LibraryThing

A feminist book that is autobiograhical and empowering, it sets us straight on how it is that second-generation folks from immigrant families struggle to turn themselves into "warriors." Kingston ... Read full review

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About the author (2010)

Born in California to immigrant Chinese parents, Kingston was educated at the University of California at Berkeley. Kingston soared to literary celebrity upon the publication of her autobiographica The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood among Ghosts (1976). The Woman Warrior is dominated by Kingston's mother; her next work, China Men (1980), although not autobiographical in the manner of her previous book, is focused on her father and on the other men in her family, giving fictionalized, poetic versions of their histories. The combination of fiction, nonfiction, memoir, and myth in both books create a form of balanced opposites that one critic has likened to yin and yang. Her first novel, Tripmaster Monkey: His Fake Book, was published in 1989.

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