The Rape of Europa: The Fate of Europe's Treasures in the Third Reich and the Second World War, Issue 53

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Random House Digital, Incorporated, 1994 - Art - 498 pages
22 Reviews
The treasures of Quedlinburg . . . the Trojan gold . . . the Amber Room. These fabled objects are only the tiny summit of an immense mountain of artifacts - artistic, religious, historic - that were sold, confiscated, stolen, dismembered, defaced, destroyed, or buried as Europe succumbed first to the greed and fury of the Nazis and then to the ravages of war. Now, in a riveting account brimming with tales of courage and sacrifice, of venality and beastliness, Lynn H. Nicholas meticulously reconstructs the full story of this act of cultural rape and its aftermath. In doing so, she offers a new perspective on the history of the Third Reich and of World War II. From the day Hitler came to power, art was a matter of highest priority to the Reich. He and other Nazis (especially Hermann Goering) were ravenous collectors, stopping at nothing to acquire paintings and sculpture, as well as coins, books, tapestries, jewels, furniture - everything. Their insatiable appetite (feared by the museum directors who sent their collections into hiding as war loomed) whipped the international art market into a frenzy of often sleazy dealing. When the German occupation of Poland, France, the Low Countries, and finally Italy began, a colossal wave of organized and casual pillage stripped entire countries of their heritage as works of art were subjected to confiscation, wanton destruction, concealment in damp mines, and perilous transport across combat zones. Meanwhile, in Washington and London curators and scholars campaigned energetically to convince President Franklin Roosevelt, Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and, most importantly, General Dwight Eisenhower to add the protection of art and edifices tothe Allied invasion agenda. The landings in Italy and France, and the ultimate victory of the Allies, brought a dedicated corps of "Monuments officers" to the ravaged continent.

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Review: The Rape of Europa: The Fate of Europe's Treasures in the Third Reich and the Second World War

User Review  - Pak Sun - Goodreads

Highly appealing topic. Very extensive facts. Recommended for really interested readers or academics. Read full review

Review: The Rape of Europa: The Fate of Europe's Treasures in the Third Reich and the Second World War

User Review  - Dvora - Goodreads

This is the story of the millions of pieces of art stolen and hidden by the Germans or hidden from the Germans during the Second World War. The blurb on the cover says "A scholarly work that reads ... Read full review

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Prologue They Had Four Years Germany Before the War The Nazi Art Purges
Period of Adjustment The Nazi Collectors Organize Austria Provides Europe Hides
Eastern Orientations Poland 19391945

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About the author (1994)

Lynn H. Nicholas was born in New London, CT, and educated in the U.S., England, and Spain. The Rape of Europa, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award, has been translated into eight languages. It inspired an international movement to locate and repatriate works of art and other property confiscated and stolen by individuals and governments before and during World War II. Ms. Nicholas was elected to the Legion d'Honneur by the government of France and was named an "Amicus Poloniae "by Poland. She has become widely known as a lecturer on the issues addressed in The Rape of Europa and Cruel World"" and has appeared as an expert witness in art-repatriation trials and before Congress.

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