The Spanish Flu: Narrative and Cultural Identity in Spain, 1918

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Springer, Aug 20, 2013 - History - 255 pages
The 1918 Spanish flu epidemic is now widely recognized as the most devastating disease outbreak in recorded history. This cultural history reconstructs Spaniards' experience of the flu and traces the emergence of various competing narratives that arose in response to bacteriology's failure to explain and contain the disease's spread.
 

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Contents

Epidemic Genre and Spanish Flu Narratives
1
Framing the Flu in the First Epidemic Wave
27
The Second Wave Begins
47
Between an Epidemic and a Sanitary Spain
69
Don Juan and Spanish Inf luenza
103
Citizens Characters and Cartoons
136
A Telling Epidemic A Storied Nation
171
Notes
179
Bibliography
229
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About the author (2013)

Ryan A. Davis is Assistant Professor of Spanish in the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures at Illinois State University, USA. His research on nineteenth- and twentieth-century Spain focuses on the intersection between literary and medical discourses, articulations of national and individual subjectivity, and, more recently, 'fringe' discourses like hypnotism. His published work has appeared in the Journal of Spanish Cultural Studies, Revista de Estudios Hispánicos, Decimonónica, and Ometeca. He is the co-editor of The Spanish Influenza Pandemic of 1918–1919: Emerging Perspectives from the Iberian Peninsula and the Americas (forthcoming).

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