Providence in Early Modern England

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Oxford University Press, 1999 - History - 387 pages
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This book is the most extensive study to date of the sixteenth- and seventeenth-century belief that God actively intervened in human affairs to punish, reward, and chastise. Providentialism has often been seen as a distinctive hallmark of puritan piety. However, Dr. Walsham argues that it was a cluster of assumptions that penetrated every sector of English society, cutting across the boundaries created by status, creed, education, and wealth.
 

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Impressively researched and compelling argument that English Protestants --and not just the extreme Puritan ones -- interpreted their world as if God shaped it on a day-to-day basis. Yet another ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction i
2
Providence Print and the Religion of Protestants
8
Sudden Deaths
65
Divine Providence and Public Calamities
116
Prodigies Portents and Prophets
167
Providence Confessional Polities
225
Pauls Cross Prophecy
281
Conclusion
326
Bibliography of Primary Sources
335
Index
373
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About the author (1999)

Alexandra Walsham is Lecturer in History at the University of Exeter.

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