Proceedings of the Boston Society of Natural History, Volume 15

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Boston Society of Natural History., 1873 - Natural history
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This scanned book is a good example of the problems with an attention to quantity, not quality. There are obvious problems with the scan!
Pages 241-242 are missing. This is an obvious huge problem
for a researches wanting to review in entirety the article which includes these pages.
The next problem is poor scans. Pages are shown that cannot be read.
Then the third problem. Poor scans get replaced with subsequent pages and then other pages get rescanned. So the pagination is out of order and unneeded pages are included within the document file.
This volume is a good example of poor quality control.
 

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Page 31 - A trench was dug across one pit (J) throwing out the soil carefully until the former bottom of the pit was reached at a depth of about five feet. On this bottom ashes and burnt clay gave evidence of an ancient fire, and at a few feet on one side several pieces of pottery, a few bones of animals, and one stone arrowhead were found. A spot had evidently been struck where food had been cooked and eaten, and though there was not time to open other pits there is no doubt but that they would tell a similar...
Page 30 - On crossing the outer wall a few low mounds are at once noticed, and all around are seen large circular depressions. At the southern portion of the fort these depressions, of which there are forty-five in all, are most numerous, thirty-seven of them being located south of a line drawn from E on the northern side of the indenture of the eastern ravine to the projecting extreme western point of the fort at H.
Page 31 - J) throwing out the soil carefully until the former bottom of the pit was reached at a depth of about five feet. On this bottom ashes and burnt, clay gave evidence of an ancient fire, and at a few feet on one side several pieces of pottery, a few bones of animals, and one stone arrowhead were found. A spot had evidently been struck where food had been cooked and eaten, and though there was not time to open other pits there is no doubt but that they would tell a similar story, and the legitimate conclusion...
Page 31 - ... to the west of the southwestern corner of the work. "Looking at all the natural advantages offered by this location, it is the one spot of the region, for several miles along the river, that would be selected today for the erection of a fortification in the vicinity, with the addition of the possession of a small eminence to the north, which in these days of artillery would command the fort.
Page 247 - TM Trippe noted the occurrence of the two forms together in Decatur and Mahaska counties, 5. magna predominating (Proc. Bost. Soc., xv, 1872, p. 239), saying: "The former (negleda) is never heard after the first of September, although it arrives as soon, or a little before the other, viz., early in March, while the latter remains till November. I have never heard a bird whose notes were intermediate between the two.
Page 31 - The natural line of the work follows this indenture and then continues in about the same northerly course along the banks of the ravine to the narrow portion of the plateau about 550 feet to the starting point.
Page 30 - ... to the starting point. There is thus a continued line, in part natural and in part artificial, which if measured in all its little ins and outs would not be far from 2450 ft.
Page 336 - BracMnpoda), after a long series of investigations, has come to the conclusion "that in every point of their structure the Brachiopoda are true worms, with possibly some affinities to the Crustacea, and that they have no relations to the Mollusca, save what many other worms may possess in common with them.
Page 220 - ... of others. In North America geographical variation exhibits two marked phases : — (1) a differentiation with differences of latitude and elevation, and (2) differentiation with differences of longitude: which, for convenience, may be termed respectively latitudinal and longitudinal variation.* In respect to both, differentiation occurs in different degrees in different groups, in accordance with their general tendency to variation, or, as it were, in proportion to their normal degree of plasticity....

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