Social Life in Northwest Alaska: The Structure of Iñupiaq Eskimo Nations

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University of Alaska Press, 2006 - History - 478 pages
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This landmark volume will stand for decades as one of the most comprehensive studies of a hunter-gatherer population ever written. In this third and final volume in a series on the early contact period Inupiaq Eskimos of northwestern Alaska, Burch examines every topic of significance to hunter-gatherer research, ranging from discussions of social relationships and settlement structure to nineteenth-century material culture."
 

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Contents

VI
1
VII
2
VIII
3
IX
5
X
9
XI
11
XII
17
XIII
29
XXVIII
102
XXIX
125
XXX
126
XXXI
129
XXXII
133
XXXIII
200
XXXIV
262
XXXV
293

XIV
31
XV
53
XVI
57
XVII
62
XVIII
63
XIX
64
XX
66
XXI
71
XXII
72
XXIII
74
XXIV
75
XXV
79
XXVI
89
XXVII
98
XXXVI
296
XXXVII
307
XXXVIII
325
XXXIX
327
XL
329
XLI
335
XLII
337
XLIII
350
XLIV
379
XLV
383
XLVI
393
XLVII
399
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About the author (2006)

Ernest S. Burch, Jr., is a historical ethnographer specializing in the study of northern peoples, especially those of northwestern Alaska and the central Canadian Subarctic. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago and has published extensively on the Iñupiat, the Caribou Inuit, kinship, and hunter-gatherer social organization. His recent books include The Iñupiaq Eskimo Nations of Northwest Alaska (University of Alaska Press 1998) and Alliance and Conflict: The World System of the Iñupiaq Eskimos (2005). He is currently a research associate of the Arctic Studies Center, Smithsonian Institution.

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