Interracialism: Black-White Intermarriage in American History, Literature, and Law

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Werner Sollors
Oxford University Press, Oct 19, 2000 - Literary Criticism - 560 pages
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Interracialism, or marriage between members of different races, has formed, torn apart, defined and divided our nation since its earliest history. This collection explores the primary texts of interracialism as a means of addressing core issues in our racial identity. Ranging from Hannah Arendt to George Schuyler and from Pace v. Alabama to Loving v. Virginia, it provides extraordinary resources for faculty and students in English, American and Ethnic Studies as well as for general readers interested in race relations. By bringing together a selection of historically significant documents and of the best essays and scholarship on the subject of "miscegenation," Interracialism demonstrates that notions of race can be fruitfully approached from the vantage point of the denial of interracialism that typically informs racial ideologies.
 

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Contents

The Virginia Act to Preserve Racial Integrity of 1924
23
Marriage and Divorce in 1913 Arizona
24
Loving v Commonwealth of Virginia 1967
26
What Is a White Man?
37
The Beginnings of Miscegenation of the Whites and Blacks
42
Interracial Marriage and the Law
54
Representing Miscegenation Law
61
Racial Purity and Interracial Sex in the Law of Colonial and Antebellum Virginia
81
Miscegenation in the Late NineteenthCentury American Novel
305
The Tragic Mulatto Theme in Six Works of Langston Hughes
317
Mark Twains Puddnhead Wilson
326
Miscegenation in Old Hepsy
330
The Drama of Racial Intermarriage
356
Jean Toomer and American Racial Discourse
369
Quadroons and Octoroons in Southern Fiction
393
The Intersecting Rhetorics of Feminism and Abolition
408

The Enforcement of AntiMiscegenation Laws
140
Reading Race Rhetoric and the Female Body in the Rhinelander Case
162
Miscegenation Law Court Cases and Ideologies of Race in TwentiethCentury America
178
Terms from the Oxford English Dictionary
211
The Miscegenation Issue in the Election of 1864
219
American Literary Tradition and the Negro
269
From Negro Character as Seen by White Authors
274
The Mulatto in American Fiction
280
The Tragic Octoroon in PreCivil War Fiction
284
The Serpent of Lust in the Southern Garden
291
The Presence of Mulatez in Cirilo Villaverde and Beyond
437
Statistics of BlackWhite Intermarriage Rates in the United States
461
Fact and Theory
473
Reflections on Little Rock
492
A Philosophical View
502
Multiracials Racial Classification and American Intermarriage
506
For Further Reading
535
Index
537
Copyright

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Page 32 - Amendments undoubtedly intended them to remove all legal distinctions among "all persons born or naturalized in the United States." Their opponents, just as certainly, were antagonistic to both the letter and the spirit of the Amendments and wished them to have the most limited effect What others in Congress and the state legislatures had in mind cannot be determined with any degree of certainty.
Page 7 - Almighty God created the races white, black, yellow, malay and red, and he placed them on separate continents. And but for the interference with his arrangement there would be no cause for such marriages. The fact that he separated the races shows that he did not intend for the races to mix.
Page 47 - Hugh Davis to be soundly whipped, before an assembly of Negroes and others for abusing himself to the dishonor of God " and shame of Christians, by defiling his body in lying with a negro.
Page 25 - ... also be imprisoned in the county jail or sentenced to hard labor for the county for not more than six months.
Page 26 - States shall have the same right in every state and territory to make and enforce contracts, to sue, be parties, give evidence, and to the full and equal benefit of all laws and proceedings for the security of persons and property as is enjoyed by white citizens, and shall be subject to like punishment, pains, penalties, taxes, licenses and exactions of every kind, and none other, any law, statute, ordinance, regulation or custom to the contrary notwithstanding...
Page 33 - There is patently no legitimate overriding purpose independent of invidious racial discrimination which justifies this classification. The fact that Virginia prohibits only interracial marriages involving white persons demonstrates that the racial classifications must stand on their own justification, as measures designed to maintain White Supremacy.
Page 26 - all persons within the jurisdiction of the United States shall have the same right in every State and Territory to make and enforce contracts, to sue, be parties, give evidence, and to the full and equal benefit of all laws and proceedings for the security of persons and property as is enjoyed by white citizens and shall be subject to like punishment, pains, penalties, taxes, licenses, and exactions of every kind, and to no other.

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About the author (2000)

Werner Sollors is Henry B. and Anne M. Cabot Professor of English and African-American Studies, and Director of the History of American Civilization Program at Harvard University.

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