Asiatic Journal

Front Cover
Parbury, Allen, and Company, 1837 - Asia
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 40 - And thou his son, O Belshazzar, hast not humbled thine heart, though thou knewest all this; but hast lifted up thyself against the Lord of heaven; and they have brought the vessels of his house before thee, and thou, and thy lords, thy wives and thy concubines, have drunk wine in them; and thou hast praised the gods of silver, and gold, of brass, iron, wood, and stone, which see not, nor hear, nor know: and the God in whose hand thy breath is, and whose are all thy ways, hast thou not glorified.
Page 66 - This easy and universal belief, so expressive of the sense of mankind, may be ascribed to the genuine merit of the fable itself. We imperceptibly advance from youth to age, without observing the gradual, but incessant, change of human affairs, and, even in our larger experience of history, the imagination is accustomed, by a perpetual series of causes and effects, to unite the most distant revolutions. But, if the interval between two memorable...
Page 132 - More than a mile immersed within the wood, At once the wind was laid; the whispering sound Was dumb: a rising earthquake rock'd the ground! With deeper brown the grove was overspread: A sudden horror seized his giddy head, And his ears tinkled, and his colour fled. Nature was in alarm; some danger nigh Seem'd threaten'd, though unseen to mortal eye.
Page 59 - At last a soft and solemn-breathing sound Rose like a steam of rich distill'd perfumes, And stole upon the air...
Page 136 - Arabian fiction never filled the world With half the wonders that were wrought for him. Earth breathed in one great presence of the spring ; Life turned the meanest of her implements, Before his eyes, to price above all gold ; The house she dwelt in was a sainted shrine ; Her chamber window did surpass in glory The portals of the dawn...
Page 61 - The leaf was darkish, and had prickles on it, But in another country, as he said, Bore a bright golden flower, but not in this soil: Unknown, and like esteemed, and the dull swain Treads on it daily with his clouted shoon; And yet more med'cinal is it than that Moly That Hermes once to wise Ulysses gave. He called it Haemony, and gave it me, And bade me keep it as of sovran use 'Gainst all enchantments, mildew blast, or damp, Or ghastly Furies
Page 132 - Methought I saw the grave where Laura lay, Within that temple where the vestal flame Was wont to burn ; and passing by that way, To see...
Page 111 - Mohegans," says an American writer, " have no adjectives in all their language. Although it may at first seem not only singular and curious, but impossible, that a language should exist without adjectives, yet it is an indubitable fact...
Page 235 - All! Every one of the operations is to be seen there. In one place, you see men strangling; in another, burying the bodies ; in another, carrying them off to the graves. There is not an operation in Thuggee that is not exhibited in the caves of Ellora.
Page 61 - And show me simples of a thousand names, Telling their strange and vigorous faculties. Amongst the rest a small unsightly root, But of divine effect, he culled me out. 630 The leaf was darkish, and had prickles on it, But in another country, as he said, Bore a bright golden flower, but not in this soil...

Bibliographic information