The Human Record: To 1700

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2001 - Science - 560 pages
0 Reviews

Unlike some other world history texts that center on the West, The Human Record provides balanced coverage of the global past. The book features both written and artifactual sources that are placed in their full historical contexts through introductory essays, footnotes, and focus questions.

The text sheds light on the experiences of women and non-elite groups while maintaining overall balance and a focus on the major patterns of global historical developments through the ages.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Pilgrimage
169
21
179
Chapter 8 Islam
229
Troubles in Late Tang and Western Europe
331
Josephus
369
Ritual
439
Gunther of Pairis
483
Pegolotti
485
17
486
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2001)

Alfred Andrea received his Ph.D. from Cornell University. He is Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Vermont, where he taught from 1967 through 2001. His initial training concentrated on medieval European history, with an emphasis on Byzantine-Western relations and the Crusades. He has since published four books on the Crusades, as well as numerous articles on a variety of historical issues. For the past thirty years, his teaching, research, and writing have focused increasingly on world history before 1600, with a particular interest in cross-cultural contacts across the Silk Road. In 2002 he was Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at the University of Louisville, and he served as president of the World History Association (WHA) in 2010-2012. In 2014, the WHA recognized him as a Pioneer of World History.

James H. Overfield, Professor Emeritus at the University of Vermont, received his BA from Dension University, his MA from the University of Chicago, and his PhD from Princeton University. During his career at Vermont he received the University's outstanding teacher award, and served many years as Department of History Chair, in which capacity he was a strong advocate for the study and teaching of global history. His publications include Humanism and Scholasticism in Late Medieval Germany (Princeton University Press, 1984), as well as numerous articles on late medieval and early modern European thought. He served as editor for three volumes (1750-1914) of the ABC-CLIO World History Encyclopedia and is author of Sources of Global History since 1900 (Cengage: 2013).