Life of Walter Quintin Gresham, 1832-1895, Volume 1

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Rand, McNally, 1919 - Judges - 875 pages
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Page 54 - When my eyes shall be turned to behold for the last time the sun in heaven, may I not see him shining on the broken and dishonored fragments of a once glorious union; on states dissevered, discordant, belligerent, on a land rent with civil feuds, or drenched, it may be, in fraternal blood.
Page 99 - I do not understand that because I do not want a negro woman for a slave, I must necessarily want her for a wife. . . . So it seems to me quite possible for us to get along without making either slaves or wives of negroes. I will add to this,
Page 148 - seceding states, but to defend and maintain the supremacy of the Constitution, and preserve the Union with all the dignity, equality, and rights of the several states unimpaired, and that as soon as these objects are accomplished, the war ought to cease.
Page 148 - feelings of mere passion or resentment, will recollect only its duty to the whole country; that the war is not waged in any spirit of oppression, or for any purpose of conquest or subjugation, or the overthrowing or interfering with the rights or established institutions of
Page 38 - ' The state of slavery is of such a nature that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons, moral or political, but only by positive law. . . . It is so odious that nothing can be suffered to support it but positive law. ... I
Page 148 - preserve the Union with all the dignity, equality, and rights of the several states unimpaired, and that as soon as these objects are accomplished, the war ought to cease.
Page 35 - to whom such labor or service may be due, his agent or attorney, is hereby empowered to seize or arrest such fugitive from labor, and take him or her before any Judge of the Circuit or District Courts of the United States residing or
Page 38 - It is so odious that nothing can be suffered to support it but positive law. ... I cannot say this case is allowed or approved by the law of England, and therefore, the black must be discharged.
Page 99 - I am not now nor ever have been in favor of bringing about in any way the social and political equality of the white and black races; that I am not
Page 99 - terms of social and political equality; and inasmuch as they cannot so live, that while they do remain together, there must be the position of superior and inferior, and

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