History of the Ottoman Empire: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time

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A. Fullarton, 1854 - Turkey - 322 pages
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Page 298 - Empire, and in virtue of which it has, at all times, been prohibited for the ships of war of foreign Powers to enter the Straits of the Dardanelles and of the Bosphorus ; and that, so long as the Porte is at peace, His Majesty will admit no foreign ship of war into the said Straits.
Page 42 - It is in the adjacent climates of Georgia, Mingrelia, and Circassia, that nature has placed, at least to our eyes, the model of beauty, in the shape of the limbs, the colour of the skin, the symmetry of the features, and the expression of the countenance." According to the destination of the two sexes, the men seem formed for action, the women for love...
Page 82 - When the queen remonstrated against this innovation, he told her ministers that princes must carry an impartial hand, as well between their subjects as between foreigners, and not convert trade, which by the laws of nations ought to be common to all, into a monopoly for the private gain of a few.
Page 36 - Sophia he proceeded to the august but desolate mansion of a hundred successors of the great Constantine ; but which, in a few hours, had been stripped of the pomp of royalty. A melancholy reflection, on the vicissitudes of human greatness, forced itself on his mind ; and he repeated an elegant distich of Persian poetry : "The spider has wove his web in the Imperial palace ; and the owl hath sung her watch-song on the towers of Afrasiab.
Page 186 - France in the divan, and the sultan was the sad spectator of a contest of which he was himself the unwilling umpire, the ostensible object, and the proposed prey. The victory of either party alike menaced him with ruin ; he had to choose between the armies of France and the fleets of England. Never was...
Page 34 - However imperfect, the weight and repetition of the fire made some impression on the walls; and the Turks, pushing their approaches to the edge of the ditch, attempted to fill the enormous chasm and to build a road to the assault.
Page 262 - My positive, absolute, definitive, unchangeable, eternal answer is, that the Sublime Porte does not accept any proposition regarding the Greeks, and will persist in its own will regarding them even to the day of the last judgment.
Page 174 - The possession of Egypt," said he, " will open a prompt communication with the richest countries of the East. It will unite the commerce of the Indies to that of France, and pave the way for great captains to march to conquests worthy of Alexander. Egypt once conquered, nothing...
Page 20 - Moslem world. Be wise in time ; reflect ; repent ; and avert the thunder of our vengeance, which is yet suspended over thy head. Thou art no more than a pismire ; why wilt thou seek to provoke the elephants? Alas! they will trample thee under their feet.
Page 32 - Among the implements of destruction, he studied with peculiar care the recent and tremendous discovery of the .Latins; and his artillery" surpassed whatever had yet appeared in the world. A founder of cannon, a Dane or Hungarian, who had been almost starved in the Greek service, deserted to the Moslems, and was liberally entertained by the Turkish sultan.* Mahomet was satisfied with the answer to his first question, which he eagerly pressed on the artist.

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