Voices from an Early American Convent: Marie Madeleine Hachard and the New Orleans Ursulines, 1727-1760

Front Cover
LSU Press, Apr 1, 2009 - History - 160 pages
0 Reviews
In 1727, twelve nuns left France to establish a community of Ursuline nuns in New Orleans, the capital of the French colony of Louisiana. Notable for founding a school that educated all free girls, regardless of social rank, the Ursulines also ran an orphanage, administered the colony's military hospital, and sustained an aggressive program of catechesis among the enslaved population of colonial Louisiana. In Voices from an Early American Convent, Emily Clark extends the boundaries of early American women's history through the firsthand accounts of these remarkable French missionaries, in particular Marie Madeleine Hachard. These fascinating documents reveal women of determination, courage, and conviction, who chose to forgo the traditional European roles of wife and mother, embrace lives of public service, and forge a community among the diverse inhabitants-enslaved and free-who occupied early New Orleans.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
INTRODUCTION
PART 1LETTERS OF MARIE MADELEINE HACHARD
PART 2OBITUARY LETTERS
PART 3PROCESSION ACCOUNT
NOTE ON TRANSLATION
APPENDIXPUBLICATION HISTORY OF HACHARDS LETTERS
INDEX
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Emily Clark is an associate professor of history at Tulane University. She is the author of Masterless Mistresses: The New Orleans Ursulines and the Development of a New World Society, 1727--1834.

Bibliographic information