A queen of tears: Caroline Matilda, queen of Denmark and Norway and princess of Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 1

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Longmans, Green, and co., 1904 - Denmark
 

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Page 14 - Here lies Fred, Who was alive, and is dead. Had it been his father, I had much rather. Had it been his brother, Still better than another. Had it been his sister, No one would have missed her. Had it been the whole generation, Still better for the nation. But since 'tis only Fred, Who was alive, and is dead, There's no more to be said.
Page 32 - She died of an inflammation in her bowels in two days. Her figure was so very unfortunate, that it would have been difficult for her to be happy, but her parts and application were extraordinary. I saw her act in " Cato" at eight years old, (when she could not stand alone, but was forced to lean against the side-scene) better than any of her brothers and sisters. She had been so unhealthy, that at that age she had not been taught to read, but had learned the part of Lucia by hearing the others study...
Page 163 - I can tell you nothing but what you will see in the papers, of the King of Denmark hurrying from one corner of England to the other, without seeing anything distinctly, fatiguing himself, breaking his chaise, going tired to bed in inns, and getting up to show himself to the mob at the window. I believe that he is a very silly lad, but the mob adore him, though he has neither done nor said anything worth repeating ; but he gives them an opportunity of getting together, of staring, and of making foolish...
Page 9 - Tis not the liquid brightness of those eyes, That swim with pleasure and delight; Nor those heavenly arches, which arise O'er each of them to shade their light: 'Tis not that hair, which plays with every wind, And loves to wanton round thy face ; Now straying round the forehead, now behind Retiring with insidious grace.
Page 14 - Had it been his brother, Still better than another. Had it been his sister, No one would have missed her. ' ;' Had it been the whole generation, , , . Still better for the nation. But since 'tis only Fred, Who was alive, and is dead, There's no more to be said.
Page 33 - Cato" at eight years old, (when she could not stand alone, but was forced to lean against the side-scene,) better than any of her brothers and sisters. She had been so unhealthy, that at that age she had not been taught to read, but had learned the part of Lucia by hearing the others study their parts. She went to her father and mother, and begged she might act They put her off as gently as they could — she desired leave to repeat her part, and when she did, it was with so much sense, that there...
Page 16 - ... loving master, were forced to bespeak a great cold dinner from a common tavern in the neighbourhood. At three o'clock indeed, they vouchsafed to think of a dinner, and ordered one— but the disgrace was complete, the tavern dinner was paid for, and given to the poor.
Page 158 - I came to town to see the Danish king. He is as diminutive as if he came out of a kernel in the Fairy Tales. He is not ill made, nor weakly made, though so small ; and though his face is pale and delicate, it is not at all ugly, yet has a strong cast of the late king, and enough of the late prince of Wales to put one upon one's guard not to be prejudiced in his favour.
Page 48 - ... in times of public tranquillity. '• I have now the satisfaction to inform you, that I have agreed with my good brother the king of Denmark, to cement the union which has long subsisted between the two crowns...

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