The Forgetting: Alzheimer's, Portrait of an Epidemic

Front Cover
Wheeler Pub., 2001 - Health & Fitness - 329 pages
3 Reviews
The real successor to Nigella Lawson's classic, How to Eat, a volume that every right-thinking person cherishes and consults regularly... Feast [is] just as entertaining and divulgent - and it works too, both as a practical manual and an engrossing read.' Evening Standard 'Feast is a voluptuous and delicious piece of food writing.' Guardian'This is the kind of food we can dream of cooking.' ObserverA feast for the eyes and the senses and now available in a handsome paperback edition, Feast is a must for every kitchen. In the style and tradition of Nigella's classic How to Eat, it applies those same 'Pleasures and Principles of Good Food' to celebrations from feast days to everyday happiness.Essentially about families and food, about public holidays and private passions, about how to celebrate the small pleasures as well as the big occasions, it includes everything from Christmas, Thanksgiving , Hanukkah and Eid, to Passover and Easter; from Meatless Feasts to Midnight Feasts, from weddings to funerals, from kitchen feasts to kids' favourites, from Partytime to the ultimate Chocolate Cake Hall of Fame. Heartwarming, passionate, informed, refreshingly uncomplicated and full of ideas, Feast is destined to become a classic like How to Eat. Written with the same enjoyment, sensuality and practical awareness, and packed with over 300 recipes and more than 200 photos, Feast proclaims Nigella's love of life and great food to celebrate it with.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - klburnside - LibraryThing

I am taking a training class for my job about Alzheimer's and I decided to read this book because I wanted more information about the disease. This book was very readable and simple to understand, but ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AudrieClifford - LibraryThing

Although this book documents and explains the progress of Alzheimer's disease from the early to the final stages, it ends up leaving the reader not only comforted but also with an almost-appreciation ... Read full review

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About the author (2001)

David Shenk a former fellow at the Freedom Forum Media Studies Center at Columbia University, he has written for Harper's Wired, Salon, The New Republic, The Washington Post, and The New Yorker, and is an occasional commentator for NPR's "All Things Considered". He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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