The British Critic: A New Review, Volume 1

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F. and C. Rivington, 1793 - Theology
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Page 393 - Heads of Colleges only, and by no others, in the room adjoining to the Printing-House, between the hours of ten in the morning and two in the afternoon, to preach eight Divinity Lecture Sermons, the year following, at St. Mary's in Oxford, between the commencement of the last month in Lent Term, and the end of the third week in Act Term.
Page 453 - Who all my fenfe confin'd To know but this, that Thou art Good, And that myfelf am blind ; Yet gave me, in this dark eftate, To fee the good from ill ; And binding nature faft in fate. Left free the human will. What Confcience...
Page 155 - AD at length sensible of the disastrous results of this conten- 1702 tion, and in 1702 the two Companies were amalgamated under the title of the " United Company of Merchants
Page 434 - In a year the wings were finished, and, on a morning appointed, the maker appeared furnished for flight on a little promontory : he waved his pinions awhile to gather air, then leaped from his stand, and in an instant dropped into the lake. His wings, which were of no use in the air, sustained him in the water, and the prince drew him to land, half dead with terror and vexation.
Page 147 - The night is their chief time of proceeding ; but if it rains by day, they do not fail to profit by the occasion ; and they continue to move forward in their slow uniform manner.
Page 28 - How shamefully the Queen our Sovereign was led captive ; and by fear, force, and, as by many conjectures may be well suspected, other extraordinary and more unlawful means, compelled to become bedfellow to another wife's husband...
Page 97 - Th' indignant pride that in my bofom fwell'd $ I fu'd — the weak attempt I blufh to own— I fu'd for mercy, proftrate at the throne. O ! blot the foible out, my noble friend, With human firmnefs human feelings blend ! When Love's endearments fofteft moments feize, And Love's dear pledges hang upon the knees, When Nature's ftrongeft...
Page 274 - For the poor shall never cease out of the land : therefore I command thee, saying, Thou shalt open thine hand wide unto thy brother, to thy poor, and to thy needy, in thy land.
Page 240 - The Dance of Death ; painted by H. Holbein, and engraved by W. Hollar.
Page 143 - Sweet maid, if thou wouldft charm my fight, And bid thefe arms thy neck infold ; That rofy cheek, that lily hand Would give thy poet more delight Than all Bocara's vaunted gold, Than all the gems of Samarcand. Boy, let yon * liquid ruby flow...

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