The Flaming Corsage

Front Cover
Wheeler Publishing, 1997 - Fiction - 276 pages
2 Reviews
The Flaming Corsage opens with a scene of carnage which tabloids will later call "The Love Nest Killings of 1908." The mystery of this massacre will not come fully unraveled until destiny joins the novel's principle characters, Katrina Taylor and Edwad Daugherty. Edward is a man destined to greatness as a playwright. Katrina is a beautiful and seductive woman with complex attitudes toward life and love. Theirs is a passionate attachment from the first. But when death strikes close to her family in a cataclysmic hotel fire, the marriage changes into something else altogether. By award-winning author.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - NoLongerAtEase - LibraryThing

The Flaming Corsage is my favorite of Kennedy's novels. I'll not argue that it's the best, the most important, or the most fully realized. I haven't the space or the desire to make such strong claims ... Read full review

THE FLAMING CORSAGE

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

``Leave the dead. Let's salvage the tie left to us,'' the protagonist of Kennedy's latest pleads with his distant, despairing wife. The struggle to escape the past is at the heart of this subtle, wise ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
38
Section 3
50
Copyright

22 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1997)

William Kennedy worked as a journalist on newspapers and magazines before he began a career as a novelist. Kennedy's novels, which are all centered around his home city of Albany, New York, include The Ink Truck, Legs, Billy Phelan's Greatest Game, Quinn's Book, Very Old Bones, and The Flaming Corsage. Kennedy's celebrated 1983 novel, Ironweed, has won great acclaim over the years, and has earned a Pulitzer Prize, a National Book Critics Circle Award, and a PEN-Faulkner Award. In addition to writing novels, Kennedy co-authored the screenplay for The Cotton Club with Francis Coppola in 1984 and wrote the screenplay for Ironweed in 1987. Kennedy and his son, Brendan, co-authored two children's books, Charlie Malarkey and the Belly Button Machine and Charlie Malarkey and the Singing Moose. William Kennedy is the founder and director of the New York State Writers Institute, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a onetime editor of the San Juan Star and a former writing teacher at Cornell University. He is now a professor in the English department of the University at Albany.

Bibliographic information