A Wrinkle in Time

Front Cover
It was a dark and stormy night; Meg Murry, her small brother Charles Wallace, and their mother had come down to the kitchen for a midnight snack when they were upset by the arrival of a most disturbing stranger. "Wild nights are my glory," the unearthly stranger told them. "I just got caught in a downdraft and blown off course. Let me sit down for a moment, and then I'll be on my way. Speaking of way, by the way, there is such a thing as a tesseract." A tesseract (in case you don't know) is a wrinkle in time. To tell more would spoil your enjoyment of Madeleine L'Engle's unusual book.

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User Review  - Completely_Melanie - LibraryThing

I really enjoyed this book. I was a little bit surprised by how much religion was in this book. I wasn't expecting that. It kind of reminded me of Narnia or Golden Compass. I look forward to seeing how the movie comes out. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Jinjer - LibraryThing

February 2020 - At first I was all into it thanks to that obnoxious little Charles Wallace and his mad sandwich making skills (adding liverwurst, cream cheese & onion to my grocery list). But then the story got all weird and magic-y in Chapter 4 so I was out. Read full review

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Contents

MRS WHATSIT
1
MRS WHO
19
MRS WHICH
34
Copyright

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About the author (1976)

Author Madeleine L'Engle was born in New York City on November 29, 1918. She graduated from Smith College. She is best known for A Wrinkle in Time (1962), which won the 1963 Newbery Medal for best American children's book. While many of her novels blend science fiction and fantasy, she has also written a series of autobiographical books, including Two Part Invention: The Story of a Marriage, which deals with the illness and death of her husband, soap opera actor Hugh Franklin. In 2004, she received a National Humanities Medal from President George W. Bush. She died on September 6, 2007 of natural causes. Since 1976, Wheaton College in Illinois has maintained a special collection of L'Engle's papers, and a variety of other materials, dating back to 1919.