Analytic Theism, Hartshorne, and the Concept of God: Intercritique of Science and Myth

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SUNY Press, Jan 1, 1996 - Philosophy - 247 pages
This book initiates a dialogue where one does not exist, and continues a dialogue where one has been tentatively initiated, regarding the concept of God in the neoclassical philosophy of Charles Hartshorne and that found in analytic philosophers who adhere to classical theism.

Two distinctive features of the book are a careful examination of Hartshorne's use of position matrices in the philosophy of religion so as to avoid a myopic view of the theoretical options open to us, and an extended treatment of the largely uncritical appropriation by analytic theists of the Aristotelian tradition in theology, a tradition that relies on a certain form of Platonism not necessarily held by Plato.

 

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Contents

SCHEMATA SCHEMA 1
1
20
2
MUST A PERFECT BEING BE IMMUTABLE?
13
CHAPTER
39
SCHEMA 3
51
SCHEMA 4
52
CHAPTER THREE
77
SCHEMA 8
86
ALSTON AND MORRIS ON THE CONCEPT OF GOD
121
SCHEMA 11
125
SCHEMA 12
128
DESCRIBING GOD
143
SCHEMA 13
156
THE CONCEPT OF GOD AND THE MORAL LIFE
173
BIBLIOGRAPHY
233
INDEX OF NAMES
245

SCHEMA 9
90

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About the author (1996)

Daniel A. Dombrowski is Professor of Philosophy at Seattle University. He is the author of Hartshorne and the Metaphysics of Animal Rights; and St. John of the Cross: An Appreciation, both published by SUNY Press, as well as Plato's Philosophy of History; The Philosophy of Vegetarianism; Thoreau the Platonist; and Christian Pacifism.

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