A Mission to Gelele, King of Dahome, Volume 1

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Tinsley brothers, 1864 - Amazons
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Page 83 - ... result where the necessaries of life are difficult to get, there may not tend to arise that social reprobation of incontinence which arises where its mischievous consequences are conspicuous. Africa furnishes us with the hint of another cause of laxity which may sometimes operate. The fact that " the Dahoman, like almost all semi-barbarians, considers a numerous family the highest blessing...
Page 248 - ... and a pollarded tree supporting an earthenware pot, with two pennons on tall poles. Along the shed, which was confined to the King and his wives, ran a line of four-and-twenty umbrellas, forming an extempore verandah. Those on the flanks were white, and mostly very ragged, sheltering the chieftainesses of the...
Page 257 - ... monkey-like appearance. On the poll, and where the bars met, was a brass bowl with a tip like a calabash stalk, by which the upper half could be raised, to serve as a drinking-cup: this, when viewed in front, looked somewhat like a Phrygian cap, or a knightly helmet. During Gelele's attack upon Abeokuta, in 1851, the people of Ishagga behaved with consummate treachery, which eleven years afterwards was terribly punished by the present ruler. Bakoko was put to death, and as a sign that he ought...
Page xi - ... is entirely put a stop to. You will remind the King that he himself suggested to Commodore "Wilmot that if we wished to put a stop to the slave trade, we should prevent white men from coming to buy them...
Page xii - As an earnest of their friendly feelings, Her Majesty's Government have caused the presents, of which a list is inclosed, to be prepared and forwarded to you for presentation to the King. You will see that, as far as possible, the King's wishes, as expressed to Commodore Wilmot, have been carried out in regard to the articles selected for presents, with the exception of the carriage and horses, and with respect to these you will explain to the King that, in the first place, it would be a difficult...
Page 268 - Wherever a she-soldiery is, celibacy must be one of its rules, or the troops will be in a state of chronic functional disorder between the ages of fifteen and thirty-five.
Page 233 - affects a dress simple to excess. His head is often bare ; on this occasion he wore a short cylindrical straw cap with a ribbon-band of purple velvet round the middle. A Bo-fetish against sickness, in the shape of a human incisor, strung below the crown, and a single blue Popo...
Page 246 - On the right side of her chair stood the Countess of Oxford, widow; and on her left hand stood the Countess of Worcester, all the dinner season ; which, divers times in the dinner time, did hold a fine cloth before the Queen's face, when she list to spit, or do otherwise at her pleasure. And at the table's end sate the Archbishop of...
Page 349 - But they were not, the passer-by noticed, uncomfortable. " The confinement was not cruel ; each victim had an attendant squatting behind him to keep off the flies ; all were fed four times a day, and were loosed at night for sleep ... It is the king's object to keep them in the best of humours . . . These men will allow themselves to be led to slaughter like lambs. It is, I imagine, the uncertainty of their fate that produces this extraordinary nonchalance.
Page 246 - ... table, under her cloth of estate. On the right side of her chair stood the Countess of Oxford, widow: and on her left hand stood the Countess of Worcester, all the dinner season ; which, divers times in the dinner time, did hold a fine cloth before the Queen's face, when sho list to spit, or do otherwise at her pleasure.