Views A-foot: Or, Europe Seen with Knapsack and Staff

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G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1862 - Europe - 506 pages
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Page 263 - Look not mournfully into the Past. It comes not back again. Wisely improve the Present. It is thine. Go forth to meet the shadowy Future, without fear, and with a manly heart.
Page 91 - IN the market-place of Bruges stands the belfry old and brown; Thrice consumed and thrice rebuilded, still it watches o'er the town. As the summer morn was breaking, on that lofty tower I stood, And the world threw off the darkness, like the weeds of widowhood.
Page 78 - A mighty mass of brick, and smoke, and shipping, Dirty and dusky, but as wide as eye Could reach, with here and there a sail just skipping In sight, then lost amidst the forestry Of masts; a wilderness of steeples peeping On tiptoe through their sea-coal canopy; A huge, dun cupola, like a foolscap crown On a fool's head - and there is London Town!
Page 22 - I am sick of descriptive letters, and will have no more of them. But I should like some sketches of German life and society, after you have been there and know something about it. If the letters are good, you shall be paid for them, but don't write until you know something.
Page 408 - Egyptian granite piercing the sky, and beyond, the great fa9ade and dome of the Cathedral, I confessed my unmingled admiration. It recalled to my mind the grandeur of ancient Rome, and mighty as her edifices must have been, I doubt if she could boast many views more overpowering than this. The facade of St. Peter's seemed close to us, but it was a third of a mile distant, and the pcople ascending the steps dwindled to pygmies.
Page 95 - The river Rhine, it is well known, Doth wash your city of Cologne; But tell me, Nymphs! what power divine Shall henceforth wash the river Rhine?
Page 408 - Hadrian reared on high," — now, the Castle of St. Angelo. Knowing that St. Peter's was to be seen from this bridge, I looked about in search of it. There was only one dome in sight, large and of beautiful proportions. I said at once, " Surely that cannot be St. Peter's ! " On looking again, however, I saw the top of a massive range of building near it, which corresponded so nearly with the pictures of the Vatican that I was unwillingly forced to believe the mighty dome was really before me.
Page viii - Jog on, jog on, the foot-path way, And merrily hent the stile-a; A merry heart goes all the day, Your sad tires in a mile-a.
Page 238 - ... of noble families who have vaults there. I passed up the narrow walk, reading the inscriptions, till I came to the tomb of Franz Clement, a young composer, who died two or three years ago. On turning again, my eye fell instantly on the word " BEETHOVEN," in golden letters, on a tombstone of gray marble.
Page 298 - ... heights, with the spire of her cathedral peeping above the top, while the French Vosges grow dim in the far perspective. The road now enters a wild, narrow valley, which grows smaller as we proceed. From Himmelreich, a large rude inn by the side of the green meadows, we enter the Hollenthal—that is, from the " Kingdom of Heaven " to the

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