62: A Model Kit

Front Cover
New Directions Publishing, 1972 - Fiction - 281 pages
39 Reviews
As one of the main characters, the intellectual Juan, puts it: to one person the City might appear as Paris, to another it might be where one goes upon getting out of bed in Barcelona; to another it might appear as a beer hall in Oslo. This cityscape, as Carlos Fuentes describes it, "seems drawn up by the Marx Brothers with an assist from Bela Lugosi!" It is the meeting place for a wild assortment of bohemians in a novel described by The New York Times as "Deeply touching, enjoyable, beautifully written and fascinatingly mysterious." Library Journal has said 62: A Model Kit is "a highly satisfying work by one of the most extraordinary writers of our time."
  

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Review: 62: A Model Kit

User Review  - Mona - Goodreads

... What an amazing book. Read full review

Review: 62: A Model Kit

User Review  - Goodreads

... What an amazing book. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
9
Section 3
18
Section 4
19
Section 5
30
Section 6
38
Section 7
54
Section 8
62
Section 13
129
Section 14
133
Section 15
163
Section 16
169
Section 17
206
Section 18
240
Section 19
271
Section 20
275

Section 9
83
Section 10
107
Section 11
114
Section 12
124
Section 21
278
Section 22
280
Copyright

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About the author (1972)

Julio Cortazar is an Argentine poet, short story writer, and translator, whose pseudonym is Julio Denis. He was born in Brussels, Belgium, in 1914. In 1918, he moved with his parents to their native Argentina. He taught high school and later French literature at the University of Cuyo, resigning after participating in demonstrations against Argentine President Juan Peron. He worked for a Buenos Aires publishing company and also earned a degree as a translator. Cortazar is part of the "boom" of excellence in Latin American letters in the 1950s and 1960s. He combines fantastic plots with commonplace events and characters, and looks for new ways for literature to represent life. His first novel, The Winners, tells the story of passengers on a luxury liner who are restricted to a certain area of the ship and forbidden to communicate with the crew. He explores the ways passengers react. Hopscotch has a complex narrative structure with 165 chapters that can be read in at least two logical sequences to create variations. A Change of Light and Other Stories is a short story collection dealing with themes ranging from political oppression to fantasy. We Love Glenda So Much is about a fan club murder of their favorite actress whose films do not meet their standards. A Certain Lucas is comprised of three sections of short observations, discussing the nature of reality, the exploration of literary form, and search for new ways to view the world.

Gregory Rabassa (born 9 March 1922) is a renowned literary translator from Spanish and Portuguese to English who currently teaches at Queens College where he is a Distinguished Professor. Rabassa received a bachelor's degree from Dartmouth; he enrolled as a graduate student at Columbia University, where he earned a doctorate. He taught for over two decades at Columbia University before accepting a position at Queens College. Typically, Rabassa translates without reading the book beforehand, working as he goes. Rabassa had a particularly close and productive working relation with Cortázar. For his version of Cortázar's novel, Hopscotch, Rabassa received a National Book Award for Translation. In 2006, he was awarded the National Medal of Arts. He has written a memoir detailing his experiences as a translator, If This Be Treason: Translation and Its Dyscontents, A Memoir.

Bibliographic information