Bulletin, Issues 56-62

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1905
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Page 49 - Rot on Turnips. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 30. Budding the Pecan. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 31. Cultivated Forage Crops of the Northwestern States. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 32. A Disease of the White Ash. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 33. North American Species of Leptochloa. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 34. Silkworm Food Plants. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 35. Recent Foreign Explorations. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 36. The ' ' Bluing ' ' and the " Red Rot ' ' of the Western Yellow Pine, with Special Reference to the Black Hills...
Page 13 - ... synonym can be advanced to the position of leading name. The several varieties bearing identical names should be distinguished by adding the name of the author who first described each sort, or by adding some other suitable distinguishing term that will insure their identity in catalogues or discussions. D. Existing American names of varieties which conflict with earlier published foreign names of the same. or other varieties, but which have become thoroughly established through long usage.
Page 6 - Price, 10 cents. 9. The North American Species of Spartina. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 10. Records of Seed Distribution and Cooperative Experiments with Grasses and Forage Plants.
Page 13 - The paramount right of the originator, discoverer, or introducer of a new variety to name it, within the limitations of this code, is recognized and emphasized.
Page 9 - Oregon, etc. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 39. The Propagation of the Easter Lily from Seed. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 40. Cold Storage, with Special Reference to the Pear and Peach.
Page 89 - ... to - 190 C. , and that we must consequently regard the protoplasm in resting seeds as existing in an absolutely inert state, devoid of any trace of metabolic activity, and yet conserving the potentiality of life. Such a state has been admirably compared by C. de Candolle with that of an explosive mixture, whose components can only react...
Page 39 - ... constructed of brush, * or of palisades driven in the sand. This stops the sand which comes from the ocean. Soon a ridge of sand forms, equal in height to the fence. A double fence is used, as it gives breadth to the dune, and stops the sand which blows through the fence on the ocean side. As soon as a ridge of sand is formed as high as the fence, the old fence is pulled up, or a new one built on top ; and so on, until a dune of the height desired is formed artificially. The proper height of...
Page 14 - Publication consists (1) in the distribution of a printed description of the variety named, giving the distinguishing characters of fruit, tree, etc., or (2) in the publication of a new name for a variety that is properly described elsewhere; such publication to be made in any book, bulletin, report, trade catalogue or periodical, providing the issue bears the date of its publication and is generally distributed among nurserymen...
Page 12 - ... References should conform to the contributions in this issue of the Jahrbuch. Figures, illustrations as well as tables should be submitted on separate sheets, be oriented on the type-area of the Jahrbuch, and be camera-ready. Reductions to 70% of the original size should be possible. Transliteration should conform to the rules of the United States Board on Geographic Names (for transliteration tables see any issue of Soviet Geography).
Page 22 - ... (1) Transplanting sand-binding plants upon the dunes, sufficiently thick to form a living cover; (2) covering the entire surface with some inert material which prevents the wind from reaching the .sand...

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