Portraits of Illustrious Personages of Great Britain: Engraved from Authentic Pictures in the Galleries of the Nobility and the Public Collections of the Country. With Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Their Lives and Actions,

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Harding and Lepard., 1835 - Celebrities
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Page 38 - I had no sooner spoken these words, but a loud, though yet gentle noise came from the heavens (for it was like nothing on earth), which did so comfort and cheer me that I took my petition as granted, and that I had the sign I demanded, whereupon, also, I resolved to print my book.
Page lxiv - ... in the lower part of the belly, and in the instant falling from his horse, his body was not found till the next morning ; till when, there was some hope he might have been a prisoner, though his nearest friends, who knew his temper, received small comfort from that imagination. Thus fell that incomparable young man, in the four and thirtieth year of his age...
Page lxi - From the entrance into this unnatural war, his natural chearfulness and vivacity grew clouded, and a kind of sadness and dejection of spirit stole upon him, which he had never been used to: yet being one of those who believed that one battle would end all differences, and that there would be so great a victory on one side, that the other would be compelled to submit to any conditions from the victor, (which supposition and conclusion generally sunk into the minds of most men, and prevented the looking...
Page liv - He was constant and pertinacious in whatsoever he resolved to do, and not to be wearied by any pains that were necessary to that end. And therefore having once resolved not to see London, which he loved above all places, till he had perfectly learned the Greek tongue, he went to his own house in the country and pursued it with that indefatigable industry that it will not be believed in how short a time he was master of it, and accurately read all the Greek historians.
Page iv - Portraits of Illustrious Personages of Great Britain, engraved from authentic Pictures in the Galleries of the ' Nobility and the Public Collections of the Country : with Biographical and Historical Memoirs of their Lives and Actions. By Edmund Lodge, Esq., FSA London, folio, three volumes (200 Engravings).
Page lv - But this charity towards them was much lessened, and any correspondence with them quite declined, when by sinister Arts they had corrupted his two younger brothers, being both children, and stolen them from his house, and transported them beyond seas, and perverted his sisters...
Page lii - His stature was low, and smaller than most men ; his motion not graceful, and his aspect so far from inviting, that it had somewhat in it of simplicity ; and his voice the worst of the three, and so untuned that instead of reconciling-, it offended the ear, so that nobody would have expected music from that tongue ; and sure no man was ever less beholden to nature for its recommendation into the world.
Page lii - Falkland ; a person of such prodigious parts of learning and knowledge, of that inimitable sweetness and delight in conversation, of so glowing and obliging a humanity and goodness to mankind, and of that primitive simplicity and integrity of life, that if there were no other brand upon this odious and accursed Civil War than that single loss, it must be most infamous and execrable to all posterity.
Page lxiii - Peace ; and would passionately profess, ' that the very agony of the war, and the view of the calamities and desolation the kingdom did and must endure, took his sleep from him, and would shortly break his heart.
Page lxi - Edge-hill, when the enemy was routed, he was like to have incurred great peril, by interposing to save those who had thrown away their arms, and against whom, it may be, others were more fierce for their having thrown them away: insomuch as a man might think, he came into the field only out of curiosity to see the face of danger, and charity to prevent the shedding of blood.

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