Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything

Front Cover
Penguin Books, 2006 - Economics - 320 pages
Which is more dangerous, a gun or a swimming pool? What do schoolteachers and sumo wrestlers have in common? Why do drug dealers still live with their moms? How much do parents really matter? What kind of impact did Roe v. Wade have on violent crime? These may not sound like typical questions for an economist to ask--but Levitt is not a typical economist. He studies the stuff and riddles of everyday life--from cheating and crime to sports and child rearing--and his conclusions regularly turn the conventional wisdom on its head. The authors show that economics is, at root, the study of incentives--how people get what they want, or need, especially when other people want or need the same thing. In this book, they set out to explore the hidden side of everything. If morality represents how we would like the world to work, then economics represents how it actually does work.--From publisher description.

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About the author (2006)

Steven D. Levitt received a B.A. from Harvard University in 1989 and a Ph.D. from M.I.T. in 1994. He is a professor of economics at the University of Chicago where he has been teaching since 1997. He was awarded the 2003 John Bates Clark Medal, an award that recognizes the most outstanding economist in America under the age of 40. He is the coauthor, with Stephen J. Dubner, of Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything. It won the inaugural Quill Award for best business book and a Visionary Award from the National Council on Economic Education. He also wrote SuperFreakonomics, Think Like a Freak and When to Rob a Bank:...And 131 More Warped Suggestions and Well-Intended Rants with Stephen J. Dubner.

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