World Poverty and Human Rights

Front Cover
Polity, Feb 26, 2008 - Philosophy - 352 pages
5 Reviews
Some 2.5 billion human beings live in severe poverty, deprived of such essentials as adequate nutrition, safe drinking water, basic sanitation, adequate shelter, literacy, and basic health care. One third of all human deaths are from poverty–related causes: 18 million annually, including over 10 million children under five.

However huge in human terms, the world poverty problem is tiny economically. Just 1 percent of the national incomes of the high–income countries would suffice to end severe poverty worldwide. Yet, these countries, unwilling to bear an opportunity cost of this magnitude, continue to impose a grievously unjust global institutional order that foreseeably and avoidably perpetuates the catastrophe. Most citizens of affluent countries believe that we are doing nothing wrong.

Thomas Pogge seeks to explain how this belief is sustained. He analyses how our moral and economic theorizing and our global economic order have adapted to make us appear disconnected from massive poverty abroad. Dispelling the illusion, he also offers a modest, widely sharable standard of global economic justice and makes detailed, realistic proposals toward fulfilling it.


Thoroughly updated, the second edition of this classic book incorporates responses to critics and a new chapter introducing Pogge′s current work on pharmaceutical patent reform.
 

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Review: World Poverty and Human Rights: Cosmopolitan Responsibilities and Reforms

User Review  - Taryn Janati - Goodreads

Note to self: From a footnote from Michael Huemer's "Is There a Right to Immigrate?": Narveson (1993, pp. 153-5) suggests that most world poverty is caused by the governments of poor countries. Thomas ... Read full review

Review: World Poverty and Human Rights: Cosmopolitan Responsibilities and Reforms

User Review  - Greg Hickey - Goodreads

The facts about the extent of global poverty are pretty staggering, as Thomas Pogge explicitly demonstrates from the outset of this book. At the time of publication, "46 percent of humankind live[d ... Read full review

Contents

Human Flourishing and Universal Justice
33
How Should Human Rights be Conceived?
58
Loopholes in Moralities
77
Moral Universalism and Global Economic Justice
97
The Bounds of Nationalism
124
Achieving Democracy
152
Cosmopolitanism and Sovereignty
174
Eradicating Systemic Poverty Brief for a Global Resources Dividend
202
Pharmaceutical Innovation Must We Exclude the Poor?
222
Last Words
262
Notes
265
Bibliography
314
Index
328
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About the author (2008)

\Thomas Pogge is Professor of Philosophy and International Affairs at Yale University, Professorial Fellow in the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics at the Australian National University, Research Director in the Centre for the Study of Mind in Nature at the University of Oslo, and Adjunct Professor in the Centre for Professional Ethics at the University of Central Lancashire.

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