Fables from the Greek and Latin (continued). Fables, imitated from La Fontaine. Fables from the Latin, French, Italian, German and original. Four satires

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Printed by George Ramsay and Company for Archibald Constable and Co., 1809 - Classical literature
 

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Boothby's English verse translations of Aesop's fables are a minor masterpiece. Not only does Boothby cover the classical Aesop, he also includes his versions in verse of neo-Latin authors such as Abstemius, along with many of the French fabulists, too!
Volume 1 contains his translations of Phaedrus into English verse, plus his translation of Avianus, along with many other fables from Greek and Latin sources. Volume 2 carries on with the Greek and Latin fables, followed by translations from La Fontaine along with other modern European fabulists.
 

Contents

The Ass and the Farmer
13
The Wolf and the Shepherds Boy
14
The Hare and her Ears
15
The Fox without a Tail
16
The Men and the Oyster
17
The Shepherd and his Dog
18
The Hare and the Tortoise
19
The Woodman and the Fox
21
The Bee the Aut and the Spider
22
FablbXXI The Horse and the Ass
23
The Cunning Man
24
The Fox and the Ape
25
The Countryman and the Justice
26
27 XXVII The Gnat and the Ox
28
The Eagle and the Serpent
29
The Storks and the Geese 50
30
The Fox and the Lion
31
The Cat and the Fox 82
32
The Man and the Serpent
33
The Castle and the Cottage
34
The Boy and the Cherries
36
The Sot and his Wife
38
The Farmer and his quarrelsome Sons
39
The Ass the Ape and the Mole
40
The Fox and the Hedgehog
41
The Eagle and the Owl
44
The Fool who sold Wisdom
46
The Eagle and the Snail
47
The Boy and the Goldfinch
48
The Diamond and the Pebble
49
The Pike and the Herring
50
The Fig Tree and the Flowering Shrub
51
Fable LV The Farmer and the Landlord
52
The Housedog and the Pointer
53
The Lad and the Schoolmaster
54
The Man and his Ass
55
The Prince and the Mountebank
57
The Fox and the Wolf
59
The Man who would choose his Lot
60
The Dreamer and his Son
61
Cupid and Death
62
LXD7 Neptune and Pallas
63
Fortune and Vice
64
LXVII
65
The Vultures and the Pigeons69
69
The Old Man and Death
70
The Scythian
72
The Drowned Woman
73
The Reed and the Oak
74
The Animals sick of the Plague
76
The Married Man
77
The Milkmaid
79
The Acorn and the Gourd
81
The Rats in Council
82
The Old Man and the young ones
83
The Doves
85

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Page 203 - Your bookseller the best can tell, If you have done them ill or well; What takes is good ; what fails is not : Reviews must fix the author's lot. If not than those we have much better, You have achiev'd no raigiity matter.
Page 203 - I, by chsnce, had brought, Serv'd to amuse the vacant thought; Then to translate him I began, And the work easily went on. A. To publish, then, is to declare You think they worth attention are : What solace they afforded you, Your readers will not care a sous : A rery unpleasant remark this, Mr. A. And when these fables you translate, Does Sir Brooke mean to translate them again into their original language ? Do you their wisdom imitate f B. Who, I ? O pray let me alone, A man unknowing and unknown....
Page 73 - Boothby's admirer* will detect the theft, from having unavoidably read this celebrated yvu/at, over and over again, at the bottom of the sign appended to some neighbouring alehouse. ' THE DROWNED WOMAN. In imitation of La Fontaine. I am not one of those who hold, That every woman is a scold. Much higher of the sex I deem ; Worthy of love, respect, esteem ; * luslitut.
Page 84 - Went with his brother.' and another finishes with thus describing the deplorable downfal of two unlucky young men, who reproached an old one with the folly of planting. ' The giddy youths small profit made. Following an avaricious trade, One in a storm at sea was drown'd, The other with a mortal wound Was on a field of battle found : Both to survive the old man's fate, And weep their sad untimely date.
Page 116 - Troth, not I, I speak the truth" — " I say, you lie, And satisfaction I must have." — •" In shewing, Sir, that you are brave What you would gain I do not see : You'd stink no less, if you kill me ; And if my 'shot should knock you o'er, You'll surely stink a great deal more.
Page 226 - Take us the foxes, the little foxes ... for our vines have tender grapes ... A fountain of gardens, a well of living waters, and streams from Lebanon . . . Awake, O north wind, and come, thou south . . . blow upon my garden, that the spices thereof may flow out ..." He was lightheaded, and he knew it. He must hold out. They were all going mad ; were, in fact, three parts...
Page 123 - In evil hour an ear he lent, To see this boasted courser went : Unwary, on his back he got, And tried to put him in a trot. He rear'd and leap'd, and plung'd about, Till from his seat he shook him out ; Then, kicking, pitch'd him o'er his head, A"d laid him on the pavement dead.
Page 226 - Cervus equum pugna melior communibus herbis Pellebat, donee minor in certamine longo Imploravit opes hominis, frenumque recepit : Sed postquam victor violens discessit ab hoste, Non equitem dorso, non frenum depulit ore.
Page 204 - ... is to declare You think they worth attention are : What solace they afforded you, Your readers will not care a sous : A rery unpleasant remark this, Mr. A. And when these fables you translate, Does Sir Brooke mean to translate them again into their original language ? Do you their wisdom imitate f B. Who, I ? O pray let me alone, A man unknowing and unknown. A. Not so unknown as you desire. Though you may out of sight retire, Malice will not be cheated so, She can pursue where'er you go.
Page 230 - ... quae etiam e naufragio una possent enatare. Namque ea vera praesidia sunt vitae, quibus neque fortunae tempestas iniqua neque publicarum rerum mutatio neque belli vastatio potest nocere.

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