Stopping and Seeing: A Comprehensive Course in Buddhist Meditation

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Shambhala, 1997 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 207 pages
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Wolf Haas' Detective Brenner series has become wildly popular around the world for a reason: They're timely, edgy stories told in a wry, quirky voice that's often hilarious, and with a protagonist it's hard not to love. In this episode, Brenner-forced out of the police force-tries to get away from detective work by taking a job as the personal chauffeur for two-year-old Helena, the daughter of a Munich construction giant and a Viennese abortion doctor. One day, while Brenner's attention is turned to picking out a chocolate bar for Helena at a gas station, Helena gets snatched from the car. Abruptly out of a job, Brenner decides to investigate her disappearance on his own. With both parents in the public eye, there's no scarcity of leads-the father's latest development project has spurred public protest, and the mother's clinic has been targeted by the zealous leader of an anti-abortion group. Brenner and God is told with a dark humor that leaves no character, including Brenner, unscathed. Haas tells the story of a fallible hero who can be indecisive and world-weary, baffled and disillusioned by what he finds, but who presses forward nonetheless out of a stubborn sense of decency-a two-year-old is kidnapped, so you find her, because that's just what you do.

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User Review  - dean_p - LibraryThing

Commentary written in Sixth Century. The four practices detailed are not so useful in a practical modern-day setting, more suited to formal practice esp in monasticism or retreat. However, excellent ... Read full review

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About the author (1997)

The T'ien-t'ai patriarch Chih-i lived from 538 to 597 of the common era. He developed an interest in Buddhism early in life, and went on to become a Buddhist monk and teacher. His manual "The Great Stopping and Seeing" is one of the most important works of T'ien-t'ai Buddhism, and was frequently relied upon by followers of Zen and Pure Land Buddhism.

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