The Monthly Microscopical Journal: Transactions of the Royal Microscopical Society, and Record of Histological Research at Home and Abroad

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Robert Hardwicke, 1871 - Microscopy
 

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Page 240 - Each memoir must be accompanied by a sealed envelope enclosing the author's name and superscribed with a motto corresponding to one borne by the manuscript...
Page 95 - Such epidermal and cortical substances are extremely rich in carbon and hydrogen ; in this resembling bituminous coal. They are also very little liable to decay, and they resist more than other vegetable matters aqueous infiltration ; properties which have caused them to remain unchanged and to resist the penetration of mineral substances more than other vegetable tissues. These qualities are well seen in the bark of our American white birch. It is no wonder that materials of this kind should constitute...
Page 97 - A single trunk of sigillaria in an erect forest presents an epitome of a coal-seam. Its roots represent the stigmaria underclay; its bark the compact coal; its woody axis the mineral charcoal ; its fallen leaves and fruits, with remains of herbaceous plants growing in its shade, mixed with a little earthy matter, the layers of coarse coal. The condition of the durable outer bark of erect trees, concurs with the chemical theory of coal, in showing the especial suitableness of this kind of tissue for...
Page 97 - Stigmaria underclay; its bark the compact coal; its woody axis, the mineral charcoal; its fallen leaves (and fruits), with remains of herbaceous plants growing in its shade, mixed with a little earthy matter, the layers of coarse coal. The condition of the durable outer bark of erect trees concurs with the chemical theory of coal, in showing the especial suitableness of this kind of tissue for the production of the purer compact coals. It is also probable that the comparative impermeability of the...
Page 96 - It will be seen from this comparison that, in ultimate composition, cork and Lycopodium are nearer to lignite than to woody fibre ; and may be converted into coal with far less loss of carbon and hydrogen than the latter. They in fact approach closer in composition to resins and fats than to wood, and, moreover, like those substances repel water, with which they are not easily moistened, and * Liebig and Kopp, Jahresbuch, 1847-48.
Page 96 - I would add to this only one further consideration. The nitrogen present in the Lycopodium spores, no doubt, belongs to the protoplasm contained in them, a substance which would soon perish by decay ; and subtracting this, the cell-walls of the spores and the walls of the sporecases would be most suitable material for the production of bituminous coal. But this suitableness they share with the epidermal tissue of the scales of strobiles, and of the stems and leaves of ferns and lycopods, and, above...
Page 93 - May, 1866. mulation, and that they are more likely to have been abundant in shales and cannel coals, deposited in ponds or in shallow waters in the vicinity of Lycopodiaceous forests, than in the swampy or peaty deposits which constitute...
Page 104 - The intestine is long and contains some pigment granules, arranged in dendritic forms, throughout its length; the whole is thrown into convolutions, and gives an almost black appearance to the worm, except when the white oviducts distended with eggs, or the seminial vessels of the male are folded over the intestine, when it has a white, mottled appearance.
Page 237 - The primary ones are of large size, and are arranged in regular quincunctial order ; they are composed of thick masses of mural cellular tissue. A tangential section of each ray exhibits a lenticular outline, the long axis of which corresponds with that of the stem. These rays pass directly outwards from pith to bark, and separate the larger woody wedges which constitute so distinct a feature in all transverse sections of this zone, and each of which consists of aggregated laminffi of barred vessels...
Page 91 - ... than a hundredth of an inch in diameter, which under the microscope are found to be spore-cases, slightly papillate externally, and with a point of attachment on one side and a slit more or less elongated and gaping on the other.

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