An Economic History of South Africa: Conquest, Discrimination, and Development

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 23, 2005 - Business & Economics - 302 pages
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This book is the first economic history of South Africa in over sixty years. Professor Charles H. Feinstein offers an authoritative survey of five hundred years of South African economic history from the years preceding European settlements in 1652 through to the post-Apartheid era. He charts the early phase of slow growth, and then the transformation of the economy as a result of the discovery of diamonds and gold in the 1870s, followed by the rapid rise of industry in the wartime years. The final chapters cover the introduction of apartheid after 1948, and its consequences for economic performance. Special attention is given to the processes by which the black population were deprived of their land, and to the methods by which they were induced to supply labour for white farms, mines and factories. This book will be essential reading for students in economics, African history, imperial history and politics.
 

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Contents

Setting the context South Africa in international perspective
1
The economy in an international perspective
3
The people and economy before 1652
13
Seizing the land conquest and dispossession
22
Abundant land and scarce labour
32
The roots of conflict
34
Defeat and dispossession of the Pedi by British and Boers
37
The final outcome land allocation in South Africa from 1913
43
Trade unions job reservation and education
157
Domination or development?
161
Forcing the pace rapid progress despite constraints
165
the unprecedented boom
172
The expansion of the financial sector and the rise of Afrikaner capitalism
176
Statedirected industrialization
180
Trends in employment output and productivity
184
Weaknesses and constraints the limits to growth
188

Making the labour force coercion and discrimination
47
The use of compulsion to obtain labour
51
Taxes restrictions on movement and other forms of pressure
55
African labour on whiteowned farms
60
Migrant labour for the mines
62
The paradox of scarce labour and low wages
67
The deterioration of the reserves
70
Creating the colour bar formal barriers poor whites and civilized labour
74
The conflict with white mineworkers
77
The poor white problem and the closing of the pastoral frontier
83
Labour policies of the Pact government 192433
85
Exporting the gold the vital role of the mineral revolution
90
The special features of gold in South Africa
93
The character and expansion of the mining industry
99
Gold mining as the engine of growth
106
Exploitation of African mineworkers
109
Transforming the economy the rise of manufacturing and commercial agriculture
113
The state tariff policy and the rise of manufacturing industry
116
Expansion of industrial output and employment
121
Faults in the foundation
127
Inefficiency low wages and skill differentials
132
The destruction of African farming and slow progress of commercial agriculture
135
Separating the races the imposition of apartheid
143
The political economy of developments after 1948
149
Apartheid versus urbanization
151
A revolution finally conies to commercial agriculture
193
Hitting the barriers from triumph to disaster
200
The decline of gold mining despite yet another windfall
203
The expansion of coal and platinum
210
Manufacturings failure to achieve exportled growth
211
The decline in fixed investment
221
Confronting the contradictions the final crisis and the retreat from apartheid
224
Changes in the labour market
230
The retreat from apartheid
240
The fallacy of cheap labour
244
the people of South Africa
252
The white population before 1900
256
the land and the geographical environment
260
Rainfall soil and vegetation
262
Diseases and pests
264
Agricultural regions
266
the labour force and unemployment
269
The census benchmarks
271
Labour market ratios
273
Interpolation and classification by economic sector
276
Guide to further reading
277
References
287
Index
294
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About the author (2005)

Charles H. Feinstein is Emeritus Professor of Economic History at the University of Oxford. His previous publications include The European Economy between the Wars (1997) and Making History Count (2002).

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