A Practical Guide to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Front Cover
Steven C. Hayes, Kirk D. Strosahl
Springer Science & Business Media, Dec 21, 2004 - Psychology - 395 pages
0 Reviews

Long awaited, here is the first book to apply the Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) model and its powerful techniques to a broad range of disorders and clinical settings. An innovative and groundbreaking approach, ACT cuts across the traditional categories of experiential, analytic, behavioral and cognitive therapies to utilize concepts of mindfulness and acceptance and the view that language is at the core of many psychological disorders. With the help of 26 expert contributors, ACT architects Hayes and Strosahl have expanded on their previous texts to give readers an elegant source of ideas for using this language/cognition-based method.

     •  A concise overview of the theory, core processes, and key therapeutic messages of ACT, plus a framework for case conceptualization using ACT.
     •  Techniques for using ACT to treat common behavior problems, including affective disorders, anxiety disorders, PTSD, and substance abuse/addiction. Chapters are included on clients with multiple problems and the severely mentally ill.
     •  Uses of ACT for stress relief, for chronic pain management, and in inpatient medical settings.
     •  Special chapters on children and families, and ACT with groups.

Modeling the psychological flexibility that is so crucial to treatment, chapters illustrate ACT’s adaptability to client problems as they arise, and its built-in strategies for cutting through impasses. Further, the book cogently differentiates ACT from related modes of therapy.

This user-friendly volume will be a welcome guide for practitioners and students alike. It offers both a cogent theoretical model and a clinical guide for all professionals who treat mental health problems, regardless of theoretical orientation.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

What Is Acceptance and Commitment Therapy?
3
What Is ACT?
13
Psychological Rigidity
24
Core Therapy Processes Intervention
31
Competencies of the ACT Therapist
51
Improving Your Skills as an ACT Therapist
57
ACT WITH BEHAVIOR PROBLEMS
75
Clinical Interventions
85
Case Conceptualization
211
Clinical Intervention
218
Clinical Considerations
242
ACT with Children Adolescents and Their Parents
249
Clinical Considerations
266
ACT for Stress
275
Clinical Considerations
291
ACT Interventions
303

Clinical Considerations
99
Formulation
106
Disorder Specific Clinical Considerations
125
Conclusion
132
Clinical Interventions
140
Clinical Considerations
151
ACT Intervention Strategies
157
Special Clinical Considerations
178
ACT with the Seriously Mentally Ill185
185
Clinical Considerations
205
Recommendations for Training Primary Care Providers
313
ACT with Chronic Pain Patients
315
Clinical Interventions
322
Clinical Considerations
337
ACT in Group Format
347
Conducting ACT Groups
354
Core ACT Areas and Application
363
Conclusion
372
Index
391
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 375 - Block, JA (2002). Acceptance or change of private experiences: A comparative analysis in college students with public speaking anxiety.
Page 387 - Turner JA, Jensen MP, Romano JM. Do beliefs, coping, and catastrophizing independently predict functioning in patients with chronic pain? Pain 2000; 85:115-125.
Page 378 - Applying a functional acceptance based model to smoking cessation: An initial trial of acceptance and commitment therapy. Behavior Therapy, 35, 689-705.
Page 375 - Bond, FW, & Bunce, D. (2003). The role of acceptance and job control in mental health, job satisfaction, and work performance. Journal of Applied Psychology, 88, 1057-1067.
Page 379 - Beliaviorism, 12, 99-110. Hayes, SC (1987). A contextual approach to therapeutic change. In N. Jacobson (Ed.), Psychotherapists in clinical practice: Cognitive and behavioral perspectives (pp. 327-387). New York: Guilford. Hayes, SC (1992). Verbal relations, time, and suicide. In SC Hayes & LJ Hayes (Eds.), Understanding verbal relations (pp. 109-118). Reno, NV: Context Press. Hayes, SC (1993). Analytic goals and the varieties of scientific contextualism. In SC Hayes, LJ Hayes, HW Reese, & TR Sarbin...
Page 376 - Brown, TA, Campbell, LA, Lehman, CL, Grisham, JR, & Mancill, RB (2001). Current and lifetime comorbidity of the DSMTV anxiety and mood disorders in a large clinical sample.
Page 378 - Gratz, KL, & Roemer, L. (2004). Multidimensional assessment of emotion regulation and dysregulation: Development, factor structure, and initial validation of the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 26, 41-54.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2004)

Steven C. Hayes, Ph.D. is Nevada Foundation Professor at the Department of Psychology at the University of Nevada. An author of more than twenty books and more than 325 scientific articles, his career has focused on an analysis of the nature of human language and cognition and the application of this to the understanding and alleviation of human suffering. In 1992 he was listed by the Institute for Scientific Information as the 30th "highest impact" psychologist in the world during 1986-1990 based on the citation impact of his writings. Dr. Hayes has been President of Division 25 of the American Psychological Association, of the American Association of Applied and Preventive Psychology and of the Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy. He was the first Secretary-Treasurer of the American Psychological Society, which he helped form. He has received the Don F. Hake Award for Exemplary Contributions to Basic Behavioral Research and Its Applications from Division 25 of the American Psychological Association and was appointed by HHS Secretary Donna Shalala to a 5 year term on the National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse in the NIH.

Bibliographic information