Papers upon genito-urinary surgery

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D. Clapp & Son, 1907 - 48 pages
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Page 22 - ... closely resemble each other clinically. In true hydronephrosis the sac which contains the fluid is the distended pelvis of the kidney, and as the internal pressure increases, the parenchyma of the kidney becomes stretched and thinned, forming sometimes no inconsiderable part of the wall of the cavity. In false hydronephrosis the fluid is contained in a sac outside the kidney. The site of this collection of fluid exactly corresponds to the position of a hydronephrotic kidoey and may lead to a...
Page 29 - ... case reported to the Surgical Section of the Suffolk District Medical Society in January, 1896.
Page 4 - ... somewhat enlarged and in an abnormally low position. The lower pole of the organ reached to just above the brim of the pelvis and the upper pole was still covered by the edge of the liver and the ribs. The kidney was not very sensitive to pressure, although firm handling caused slight discomfort. It was not possible with moderate force to push the kidney up into place, and a persistent effort to accomplish this was not thought advisable lest some venous thrombus should be dislodged by such maneuvre....
Page 7 - ... briefs on the points raised in this case, yet they have utterly failed to show that any construction has ever been put on the notice required, other than what the plain language of the law would indicate, and which was followed in making this appointment. The case of Crandall v. Shaw, 2 Redf. Sur. 100, is the only case which I have been able to find, where the question of notice was decisive. In that case, a petition for the probate of the will had been filed and a citation issued. Application...
Page 23 - ... large retroperitoneal tumor, more especially where a free passage along the ureter is interfered with ; under these circumstances a large cyst may develop with a smooth inner wall containing urine mingled with detritus of blood.
Page 24 - When the effused fluid is urine, extensive urinary infiltration is prevented ; while in cases of hemorrhage from a ruptured kidney the blood presently fills this capsule tightly and by its own internal pressure brings the bleeding to a standstill. The subsequent history of one of these cases will vary according as the effusion contains urine or not. • If the effusion consists of blood alone it will usually disappear by absorption. When absorption is slow, aspiration of the serous part of the haematotna...
Page 30 - Examination of the urine soon after the operation gave a specific gravity of 1.020, a slight trace of albumin. In the sediment hyaline and granular casts, with fat adherent. The patient was in a rather feeble condition during her convalescence, with edema of the ankles, which postponed further operative treatment. On May...
Page 39 - ... of which time the power of voluntary urination has been invariably restored. In some few cases the patients preferred to have the catheter retained till the tenth or twelfth day on account of the comfort of keeping the dressings dry. The in-lying catheter does not interfere with getting the patient out of bed, and it is our practice to get them up as soon as possible, for they seem to do better when moving about. Mortality. In the past four years I have operated on thirty-five cases by perineal...
Page 26 - Although the dilatation of the kidney did not make itself noticed until some years after birth, the condition that led to it was a congenital one. It is an interesting speculation whether it...
Page 26 - When the ureter was reached it was found that just after leaving the pelvis it was looped over a little artery which ran direct from the aorta to the lower part of the kidney. The wall of the ureter was very thin at the bend where it was caught up over this vessel, and the calibre was so narrowed that the finest probe could not pass.

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