Pocket dictionary of the Scottish idiom in which the signification of the words is given in English and German, chiefly calculated to promote the understanding of the works of Sir Walter Scott, Rob. Burns, Allan Ramsay &c., with an appendix containing notes explicative of Scottish customs, manners, traditions &c

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Printed for Brothers Borntraeger, 1826 - Foreign Language Study - 232 pages
 

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Page ii - Pocket Dictionary of The Scottish Idiom in which the signification of the words is given in English and German, chiefly calculated to promote the understanding of the works of Sir Walter Scott, Rob. Burns, Allan Ramsay etc.
Page 222 - Hunt, and amongst others, was tolerated to wear the jacket of the order. . 17. Beverage. This is a gift or a compliment paid, as a forfeit, by one wearing a new dress. If the wearer is a young •woman, she is generally saluted -with a kiss on the occasion, which she is expected to permit, as a forfeit. 18.
Page 22 - Brose, a dish made by pouring boiling water on oat-meal and stirring it...
Page 220 - Look over your left shoulder, and you -will see the appearance of the person invoked, in the attitude of pulling hemp. Some traditions say: ,,come after mer and shaw thee'* that is , show thyself: in which case it simply appears. Others omit the harrowing, and say; ,,come after me, and harrow thee".
Page 155 - Scab, v. to cut in the manner a cheese is proved before sale; to take long stitch,es in sewing; to dip the shuttle in weaving, so that the woof appears above the warp, — the cloth is then said to be scabbed, ben .Sdf...
Page 28 - Connie, s. candle, £irf)f. fad.], gentle , mild , dexterous, safe, trustworthy ,lucky, fortunate, used in a superstitious sense. In this sense it is often used negatively, as : she's no canny, ie she is something unlucky, un,, hallowed, fcmft, ca:%J ™to<' a****
Page 26 - Buttock-mail. The fine imposed upon fornicators, in lieu of sitting upon the stool of repentance.
Page 117 - ... to speak querulously, to eat as a person who has no teeth, bfl3 9)iaitl »erjtd;cn, nagen, «ffcn ivtc 3jtnnnb b«r feine 3"i)ne Inif, in flagltdjem £onc fprc
Page 169 - Slype, v. to slip, to fall over as a wet furrow from the plough, fdjlfipfen, fiberfatten, fid) umlegen, rote tie naffe CErbe bcim <J3ffugen.
Page 29 - Halloween is thought to be a night when witches, devils, and other mischief-making beings arc all abroad on their baneful, midnight errands ; particularly those aerial people, the fairies, are said, on that night, to hold a grand anniversary.

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