China Forever: The Shaw Brothers and Diasporic Cinema

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Poshek Fu
University of Illinois Press, 2008 - History - 270 pages

Started in Shanghai in the 1920s, the legendary Shaw Brothers Studio began to dominate the worldwide Chinese film market after moving its production facilities to Hong Kong in 1957. Drawing together scholars from such diverse disciplines as history, cultural geography, and film studies, China Forever addresses how the Shaw Brothers raised the production standards of Hong Kong cinema, created a pan-Chinese cinema culture and distribution network, helped globalize Chinese-language cinema, and appealed to the cultural nationalism of the Chinese who found themselves displaced and unsettled in many parts of the world during the twentieth century.

Contributors are Timothy P. Barnard, Cheng Pei-pei, Ramona Curry, Poshek Fu, Lane J. Harris, Law Kar, Sundiata Keita Cha-Jua, Lilly Kong, Siu Leung Li, Paul G. Pickowicz, Fanon Che Wilkins, Wong Ain-ling, and Sai-shing Yung.

 

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Contents

intro
1
chapter 1
27
index
261

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About the author (2008)

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Poshek Fu is a professor of history, cinema studies, and East Asian languages and cultures at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of Between Shanghai and Hong Kong: The Politics of Chinese Cinemas and Passivity, Resistance, and Collaboration: Intellectual Choices in Occupied Shanghai.

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