Chicago and the Old Northwest, 1673-1835: a study of the evolution of the northwestern frontier, together with a history of Fort Dearborn

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University of Chicago Press, 1913 - Chicago (Ill.) - 480 pages
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Page 184 - I am the Father of the English, of the French, of the Spaniards, and of the Indians. I created the first man, who •was the common Father of all these people, as well as yourselves ; and it is through him whom I have awakened from his long sleep, that I now address you.
Page 344 - Far and wide the grassy Prairie teemed with figures ; warriors mounted or on foot, squaws, and horses. Here a race between three or four Indian ponies, each carrying a double rider, whooping and yelling like fiends. There a solitary horseman with a long spear, turbaned like an Arab, scouring along at full speed; — groups of hobbled horses ; Indian dogs and children, or a grave conclave of grey chiefs seated on the grass in consultation.
Page 399 - ... distance. We had proceeded about a mile and a half, when it was discovered that the Indians were prepared to attack us from behind the bank. I immediately marched up with the company to the top of the bank, when the action commenced ; after firing one round, we charged, and the Indians gave way in front and joined those on our flanks.
Page 185 - Croche, because the world is changed from what it was. It is broken, and leans down, and, as it declines, the Chippewas, and all beyond, will fall off and die. Therefore, you must come to see me, and be instructed. Those villages which do not listen to this talk, and send me two deputies, will be cut off from the face of the earth!
Page 189 - gave this great island to his red children ; he placed the whites on the other side of the big water; they were not contented with their own, but came to take ours from us. They have driven us from the sea to the lakes : we can go no further.
Page 82 - Vincennes, and, most populous of all, the settlements along the eastern shore of the Mississippi from the mouth of the Missouri to the mouth of the Ohio, on what later came to be known as the "American Bottom.
Page 398 - We had proceeded about a mile and a half, when it was discovered that the Indians were prepared to attack us from behind the bank. I immediately marched up with the company to the top of the bank, when the action commenced ; after firing one round, we charged, and the Indians gave way in front and joined those on our flanks. In about fifteen minutes they got possession of all our horses, provisions, and baggage of every description, and finding the Miamies...
Page 355 - Every injury, or act of hostility, committed by one or either of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. ART. 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America and all the individuals composing the...
Page 311 - Then advancing a step or two, he paused, saying, ' I do not wish to be put in irons. Let me be free. I have given away my life — it is gone — (stooping and taking some dust between his finger and thumb, and blowing it away) — like that' — eyeing the dust as it fell, and vanished from his sight, then adding — 'I would not take it back. It is gone.
Page 341 - Many were the scenes which here presented themselves, portraying the habits of both the red men and the demi-civilized beings around them. The interior of the village was one chaos of mud, rubbish, and confusion. Frame and clapboard houses were springing up daily...

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